These Americans would live in the shadow of a Trump wall

These Americans would live in shadow of a Trump wall
These Americans would live in shadow of a Trump wall

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    These Americans would live in shadow of a Trump wall

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These Americans would live in shadow of a Trump wall 03:32

Story highlights

  • Immigration could be the most divisive issue in this election for the candidates
  • In 2010, there were 421 assaults on border agents in the Tucson sector

Naco, Arizona (CNN)John Ladd gets a call at 8 p.m. on a Wednesday. It's from Customs and Border Protection. They're calling about two unknown trucks on Ladd's ranch. He is calm -- this is routine.

Ladd lives on the US-Mexico border in Naco, Arizona. He gets calls from CBP daily about suspicious activity on his ranch. It turns out this evening's call was nothing to worry about. But some of the calls have been more serious, even deadly.
    "It was in the mid-morning. Our friend Rob Krentz was driving around in his ATV, checking water on his ranch when he happened upon two illegals," recalled Ladd. "One acted like he was hurt when he saw Rob coming. Rob drove up on the guy, and the guy stood up and killed him and then shot his dog."
    John Ladd driving on his ranch in Naco, Arizona.
    According to Customs and Border Protection, Krentz's death came at the height of violence at the border. In 2010, there were 421 assaults on border agents in the Tucson sector near Krentz's ranch. Since then, assaults have dropped to 87 in 2015.
    Immigration could be the most divisive issue in this election for the candidates. Ladd and his fellow ranchers, who live just feet from the border, are voting for Donald Trump.
    "Political correctness has killed our country," said Ladd. "What appeals to me with Trump and most everything he said is he's dealing with reality."
    About 10 years ago, the federal government built the fence on his land to divide the two countries. In recent years, these ranchers have noticed a change in the types of people coming across.
    Fred Davis and John Ladd at the U.S.-Mexico border on Ladd's ranch.
    "It's drug smugglers," Ladd said as he stood just feet from the border fence. "That's the danger right now that we're facing."
    John and his wife, JoBeth, say they've given dozen of tours to politicians on their ranch, pleading with them for help, but always coming up empty-handed. Fellow ranchers Fred and Peggy Davis live 25 miles up the road on their own ranch and deal with many of the same issues -- they're looking to Trump to fix them.
    "It was refreshing to me to finally have somebody step up and have the nerve to say 'We've got to stop this,'" said Peggy Davis.
    Trump's strong messaging has resonated with ranchers in the area, but they say a Trump wall isn't enough.
    "There's nothing wrong with the wall," said Fred Davis. "It's fine. It makes it harder. But a wall alone is nothing."
    Ladd isn't banking on seeing a wall go up in his backyard anytime soon.
    "I don't think he's physically going to build a wall," he said. "He's going to build a wall through political relations, which I agree with that."
    The fence that divides the U.S. and Mexico in Naco, Arizona.
    For the first time in decades, Arizona is in a dead heat in this election.
    In some polling, Hillary Clinton has pulled ahead in this traditionally red state. It could turn blue for the first time since her husband took office. But a Hillary Clinton presidency scares many border residents.
    "When people hear amnesty, we get a flood, another flood of people coming across," said Peggy Davis. "Those people who have come through us for the past 20 years came through us, but came to live with you."
    "They tore up our ranchers and our livelihood and put our lives at risk. "