Leonardo DiCaprio calls out lack of climate change questions during debates

climate change 97 percent consensus orig_00005513
climate change 97 percent consensus orig_00005513

    JUST WATCHED

    Scientists agree: Climate change is man-made

MUST WATCH

Scientists agree: Climate change is man-made 02:29

Story highlights

  • Leonardo DiCaprio says lack of understanding about climate change led to the issue being snubbed during presidential debates
  • DiCaprio executive produced and stars in a new documentary about climate change called "Before the Flood"

(CNN)Leonardo DiCaprio traveled to almost every corner of the globe while making his new climate change documentary, "Before the Flood." But back in America, the Oscar-winning actor wishes more attention was being paid to the issue, particularly during the recent presidential debates.

"This issue has become so polarizing while at the same time one of the least discussed -- and probably least understood -- of our political discourse," he told the crowd at a Los Angeles screening of his film on Monday night. "Not one question about climate change was asked during the presidential or vice presidential debates — not one."
This is mostly true.
    During the three presidential debates and the vice presidential debate, no question about climate change was directed to the candidates from moderators. Candidates' sole question regarding their energy policy was asked at the town hall debate by audience member Ken Bone, whose red sweater arguably received more attention than the candidates' response to his query.
    Environmentalists and climate experts also took note of the debate snub.
    "Before the Flood" director Fisher Stevens said the lack of conversation about climate change was largely the impetus for he and DiCaprio embarking on an almost three-year journey to make the documentary. (The film was made at the same time DiCaprio was in production for "The Revenent," a role for which the actor won an Academy Award.)
    During production, they traveled to Miami, Beijing, Canada and Indonesia, among other locations.
    It features appearances from President Barack Obama, Pope Francis and John Kerry.
    Stevens and DiCaprio -- who both support Hillary Clinton -- met their goal of releasing the film before the upcoming November election.
    "We're hoping the younger generation are smarter than we are, and they're going to start getting interested and involved in this issue because it's going to affect them the most," Fisher told CNN after the event.
    "Before the Flood" will air globally in 171 countries and 45 languages on National Geographic on October 30.
    "This year in particular, we all need to use our voices to vote and demand action from our elected officials and world leads and vote for those who believe in the undeniable facts about climate change," DiCaprio said. "It is up to all of us."