Chaffetz explains why he's pulling support for Trump

Story highlights

  • "This was not just locker talk -- this was offensive," Chaffetz said
  • Chaffetz said he "felt bad" for the country

WARNING: This story contains graphic language.

Washington (CNN) — The Republican congressman who led the investigation into Hillary Clinton's private email server explained on Friday why he's no longer voting for Donald Trump.
    Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz told CNN's Don Lemon that he can no longer support Trump for President after his extremely vulgar comments about women from unaired footage filmed in 2005.
    "My wife, Julia and I, we have a 15-year-old daughter," Chaffetz said. "Do you think I can look her in the eye and tell her that I endorsed Donald Trump for president when he acts like this and his apology? That was no apology, that was an apology for getting caught."
    Chaffetz, the House Oversight Committee chairman who led the Hill investigation into Clinton's email use while secretary of state, continued: "So I'm not going to put my good name and reputation and my family behind Donald Trump when he acts like this, I just can't do it."
    Trump bragged about trying to have sex with a married woman and being able to grope women in footage leaked from 2005 that surfaced on Friday.
    Among other lewd statements, Trump said, "When you're a star, they let you do it. You can do anything ... Grab them by the pussy. You can do anything."
    Trump later issued a brief apology, calling the conversation "locker room banter."
    Chaffetz disagreed.
    "This was not just locker talk -- this was offensive," he said. "I can't tell the good people of Utah that I endorsed a person who acts like this."
    Asked whether Trump could do anything to make it up to voters and the Republican Party, Chaffetz responded, "I don't know."
    Lemon repeatedly asked if Chaffetz thinks Trump should "step aside."
    "Well I do think (Trump's running mate) Mike Pence should be at the top of the ticket," he said. "I really do ... he is a person of high moral fiber."
    Chaffetz said he "felt bad" for the country, adding that "everyone is going to have to figure this out" for themselves.