Reality Check Quick Takes: Iraq, birtherism, and climate change

Story highlights

  • CNN fact-checked the first presidential debate

Hempstead, New York (CNN)Donald Trump's tenuous relationship with the truth didn't stop at the doors of the first presidential debate of 2016.

The Republican nominee repeatedly tussled with Hillary Clinton over his own past statements, his tax returns and even the murder rate in New York City.
But Trump also stubbornly stood by two lies that he's stood by in recent weeks and was bound to be asked about at the debate.
    In a lengthy exchange with moderator Lester Holt, Trump repeatedly insisted -- falsely -- that he opposed the Iraq War. And he continued to claim that Clinton was involved in spreading the "birther" conspiracy theory that shot him to political prominence.
    While Trump made several brazenly false claims in just 90 minutes onstage, Clinton stuck to the facts.
    From misrepresentations to half-truths and flat-out lies, Trump has talked around and away from the truth more brazenly than any major party presidential nominee in modern political history. Clinton has made misleading and even false statements about her use of a private email server during her time as secretary of state.
    We kept the candidates honest throughout the debate -- fact by fact.
    Trump: "I did not support the war in Iraq."
    REALITY CHECK: FALSE
    "Wrong," Trump said when Clinton accused him of supporting the Iraq War. But Trump was on the record as supportive of the Iraq War as early as a month before Congress voted to authorize military force in Iraq and even soon after the invasion. He didn't express his outright opposition to the war until more than a year later, in an August 2004 interview.
    Trump: "She was involved" in spreading birtherism
    REALITY CHECK: FALSE
    The debate wasn't the first time Trump has alleged Clinton spread the lie that Obama was not born in the US. But it's still wrong. A 2008 Clinton campaign volunteer coordinator was fired after forwarding an email promoting the conspiracy theory, but the campaign itself never questioned Obama's birthplace. Trump, meanwhile, continued pushing birtherism for years after Obama released his birth certificate in 2011.
    Trump: Stop-and-frisk wasn't ruled unconstitutional
    REALITY CHECK: FALSE
    "You're wrong," Trump said when debate moderator Lester Holt raised the fact that the practice as used in New York was ruled unconstitutional. But it was, by a federal judge in 2013.
    Trump: "Murders are up" in NYC
    REALITY CHECK: FALSE
    Murders are continuing to trend downward in New York City. They're down 4.3% from this time last year, according to New York Police Department statistics.
    Trump: Clinton called TPP "gold standard of trade deals"
    REALITY CHECK: TRUE
    Clinton said in 2012 as secretary of state that the Trans-Pacific Partnership deal "sets the gold standard in trade agreements." The trade deal wasn't yet finalized, and Clinton announced she opposed the deal after it was signed.
    Clinton: Trump called climate change a hoax "created by the Chinese"
    VERDICT: TRUE
    Trump has tweeted on several occasions that climate change was "created by the Chinese" or "an expensive hoax."
    He also told CNN last September that he's "not a believer in climate change."
    Later, Trump walked back his claim a bit, saying, "Obviously, I joke, but this is done for the benefit of China because China does not do anything to help climate change."
    Trump: "I am going to cut taxes big league and you are going to raise taxes big league. End of story."
    REALITY CHECK: MOSTLY FALSE
    Most Americans will see no change in their taxes as a result of Clinton's tax plan. But nearly all of those increases will fall on the top 1% of taxpayers and the bottom 95% of taxpayers will see little or no change in their taxes, according to the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center.
    Trump: "You've been fighting ISIS your entire adult life"
    REALITY CHECK: FALSE
    ISIS only came into being in 2006 after splintering from al-Qaeda in Iraq. Clinton was born in 1947.
    Clinton: "Donald rooted for the housing crisis"
    REALITY CHECK: MOSTLY TRUE
    Trump said in 2006, "I sort of hope that happens because then people like me would go in and buy."
    Trump: "Ford is leaving. "Their small car division -- thousands of jobs, leaving Michigan, leaving Ohio."
    REALITY CHECK: FALSE
    In his opening question, the Republican nominee alleged that Ford was "leaving" the United States and cutting thousands of jobs while moving production plants to Mexico. Ford is opening a new plant in Mexico, but they're not cutting any US jobs to do it.
    Clinton: Russia hacked the DNC
    REALITY CHECK: TRUE
    The US government has not publicly accused Russia of hacking the DNC, but multiple cybersecurity firms independently linked the DNC hack to Russian military intelligence, and a US official told CNN in July there was "little doubt" Russia was behind the hack. While Russia hasn't admitted to the hack, the prevailing opinion points to Russian involvement.
    Trump denies calling pregnancy "an inconvenience" to employers
    REALITY CHECK: FALSE
    Clinton lobbed the accusation, and Trump responded flatly, "I never said that." But he did. In an Oct. 2004 interview, Trump said pregnancy "is a wonderful thing," but "certainly an inconvenience for a business."