Clinton economy speech to focus on valuing people with disabilities

Story highlights

  • Clinton is offering voters an implicit contrast with Trump
  • Clinton will outline a series of policy proposals for people with disabilities

Chappaqua, New York (CNN)Hillary Clinton's economic speech on Wednesday in Orlando will focus on how the United States can create an economy that values people with disabilities, an attempt to contrast the former secretary of state with Republican nominee Donald Trump.

Clinton, an aide said Tuesday, will propose an economy that "welcomes people with disabilities, values their work, rewards them fairly, and treats them with respect."
    Wednesday's speech is Clinton's fourth in a series of addresses where the former first lady is attempting to talk more about her values and proposals and less about Trump. Clinton has so far given "Stronger Together" speeches on faith, community service and children and families.
    While those speeches have focused more on Clinton, they have not been devoid of Trump contrast. In all three speeches, Clinton has tried to keep her talk of Trump to a minimum, but they have cast him as an ill-prepared candidate who should not be president. And Wednesday's speech will be no different.
    Clinton's campaign and Democrats view Trump's attacks on New York Times reporter Serge Kovaleski, whose arthrogryposis impairs the movements in her arm, as their most effective character attack against the Republican nominee.
    Trump mocked Kovaleski during a campaign event in South Carolina last year after the reporter questioned Trump for citing his story as proof that "thousands" of Muslims celebrating in Jersey City, NJ, as the World Trade Center towers burned and fell during the 9/11 terror attack.
    Clinton turned Trump's comments into her first general election campaign ad.
    By talking about what she would do for people with disabilities, Clinton is offering voters an implicit contrast with Trump.
    Clinton will outline a series of policy proposals for people with disabilities on Wednesday, according to the aide, including eliminating sub-minimum wages for people with disabilities and proposing "new partnerships with businesses to improve hiring practices for those living with a disability."
    After the speech Wednesday, the aide said, Clinton will be "the only candidate with a plan for an economy that includes more people with disabilities."