Warren: Trump is tapping into real anger

Elizabeth Warren: Donald Trump tapping into real anger
Elizabeth Warren: Donald Trump tapping into real anger

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    Elizabeth Warren: Donald Trump tapping into real anger

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Elizabeth Warren: Donald Trump tapping into real anger 02:05

Story highlights

  • "The way I see this is that Donald Trump has tapped into something that's real," Warren said
  • Warren slammed Republicans over the failed Zika bill

Washington (CNN)Sen. Elizabeth Warren said she understands why Republican nominee Donald Trump's tone in the election might appeal to "angry" voters -- but she insists his solutions won't work if they're implemented.

"The way I see this is that Donald Trump has tapped into something that's real," she told CNN's Jake Tapper on "The Lead." "He's tapped into how angry people feel about that, rightly angry. The thing is Donald Trump's so-called solution just heads us in the wrong direction."
    The Massachusetts senator, who has endorsed Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton for president and is an outspoken critic of Trump, said that his method of campaigning has pinned dissatisfied voters against other groups in the country.
    "It's them," she said, imitating Trump's rhetoric. "It's the people who don't look like you. It's the people who don't worship like you. It's about immigrants, it's about Mexicans, it's about women, it's about everybody else. It's about them. Donald Trump is about turning people against each other."
    She also slammed Trump for taking compliments from Russian President Vladimir Putin, saying he should remember he's running for president and not "dictator" of the United States.
    "He's out complimenting the guy, calling him a better president than Barack Obama. And how does he know that? Because he has higher approval ratings? I mean, Saddam Hussein had high approval ratings too," she said. "Donald Trump needs to remember that he isn't running for dictator. He's running to be president of a democratically elected country."
    Warren said that regardless of Clinton's past ties to Wall Street, she will work to get money out of politics.
    "We need to take this country back. But right now, money sloshing through the electoral process is making that impossible," she said. "(Clinton) has said that she will work to get money out of politics."
    When asked if she would work as a watchdog of a Clinton administration, Warren said yes.
    "Hillary Clinton has laid out a progressive agenda. She laid it out during the primaries and she has stuck with it in the general. She has said, this is what I'm running for," she said. "The way I see it, it is the job of the progressives to get her elected on a progressive agenda and then work our rear ends off to help get that progressive agenda enacted when she is president."
    Warren weighed in on the Zika bill that wasn't passed by the Senate after Republicans tacked on amendments that would have blocked Planned Parenthood funding and allowed Confederate flags to fly at veterans' cemeteries.
    If an agreement is not reached, the government could shut down September 30, a few weeks before the presidential and congressional elections.
    "We're being forced right now in the United States into hard choices in part because Republican obstructionism has kept us from moving faster and more aggressively on Zika," she said. "Every day that they delay on just letting us get just a clean -- stop playing politics -- just a clean bill through to fund the research and public health on Zika is another day that the virus takes hold of more people."
    Warren also praised the Consumer Protection Financial Bureau -- which she helped create -- for fining Wells Fargo after it was discovered that the bank's employees were opening fake accounts and cheating its customers.
    "My first reaction is, wow, am I glad we have the Consumer Financial Protection bureau," she said. "It's not that we need more laws. What we need is aggressive enforcement of those laws."