Viewers guide to the Democratic convention

Story highlights

  • Clinton will accept the nomination Thursday
  • President Obama and Vice President Biden will speak Wednesday

Philadelphia (CNN)Hillary Clinton officially won the Democratic presidential nomination Tuesday. Then, Bill Clinton took the Democratic National Convention on a 45-minute tour through the former first lady, senator and secretary of state's biography.

"In the spring of 1971," he began, "I met a girl."
    Bill Clinton's case for Hillary Clinton as a "change-maker" headlined the convention's second day. It followed first lady Michelle Obama stealing the show Monday, when she made the case that Clinton's character and temperament makes her a strong role model for America's children -- while taking thinly-veiled shots at Trump.
    Wednesday, it's President Obama and VP nominee Tim Kaine.
    Here's what to watch the next two nights in Philadelphia:

    Wednesday

    President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden will both be on hand to make their case for Clinton -- potentially overshadowing the rest of the evening's roster.
    But also introducing himself to the nation Wednesday night will be Tim Kaine, just days after being tapped by Clinton as her running mate. He's a former Richmond mayor, Virginia governor and senator, and Democratic National Committee chairman, but he's never run nationally before.
    Clinton will get a shot of independent credibility from former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who will denounce Trump and make his case for Clinton. Bloomberg aligns with Democrats on issues like gun control and immigration, but his coziness with Wall Street could make some liberal activists uneasy.

    Thursday

    Clinton will accept the Democratic nomination and deliver one of the biggest speeches of her political life -- on par with declaring in China that "women's rights are human rights" and more important than her 2008 concession speech in which she declared she'd placed "18 million cracks" in the glass ceiling.
    She'll take a page from Trump's book in doing so.
    Trump was introduced by his daughter, Ivanka. And Clinton will be introduced by her daughter, Chelsea.
    What the two daughters have in common: Both have the capacity to humanize their parents, who are among the least-liked major party nominees in history.
    Retired Gen. John Allen, who led the war in Afghanistan, will also be among the night's marquee speakers.