Poll: 70% have unfavorable opinion of Trump

Trump's victory speech calms some GOP skeptics
Trump's victory speech calms some GOP skeptics

    JUST WATCHED

    Trump's victory speech calms some GOP skeptics

MUST WATCH

Trump's victory speech calms some GOP skeptics 03:29

Story highlights

  • A new poll finds 7 out of 10 American adults have an unfavorable opinion of Trump
  • Hillary Clinton's unfavorability is at 55%, meaning both presumptive nominees have historically high unfavorable numbers

(CNN)Donald Trump's unfavorability level is at 70%, the highest since announcing his presidential campaign, according to a new poll out Tuesday.

According to the new Washington Post/ABC News survey, 7 out of 10 American adults have an unfavorable opinion of the Republican presumptive presidential nominee. That's a significant reversal from a few weeks ago when Trump's polling seemed to be trending upward. Just 29% reported having a favorable opinion of Trump in the new poll. Among Hispanic respondents, that number is 89% unfavorable.
Even as Trump faces steep headwinds on hte favorability front in his presidential bid, he is helped by his presumptive opponent Hillary Clinton's own set of problems, though hers are not quite as severe. The likely Democratic nominee carries a net negative rating of -12, with 55% saying they have an unfavorable opinion of her and 43% reporting a favorable opinion.
According to ABC News, the poll "cements (Clinton and Trump's) position as the two most unpopular presumptive major party nominees for president in ABC News/Washington Post polling dating to 1984."
The polling stumble comes as Trump has spent the better part of June fending off criticisms from Democrats in addition to members of his own party -- related to his heritage-based criticism of a federal judge, his renewed call for a Muslim travel ban, and lingering resistance to his nomination for president. Clinton, conversely, has seemingly wrapped up the Democratic nomination and enjoyed high-profile endorsements from party leaders like President Barack Obama and progressive star Elizabeth Warren.
The Washington Post-ABC poll was conducted June 8 through 12 among a random national sample of 1,000 adults reached on cellular and landline phones. The margin of error is plus or minus 3.5 points.