Clintons earned more than $6.7 million from paid speeches in 2015

Story highlights

  • Hillary Clinton made more than $1.4 million on paid speeches and over $5 million off book royalties in 2015
  • The Clintons' paid speeches have drawn the ire of liberal Democrats and Bernie Sanders supporters

(CNN)Hillary Clinton made more than $1.4 million on paid speeches and over $5 million off book royalties in 2015, according financial disclosure forms released on Tuesday.

The forms, which are legally required for presidential candidates, detail how Hillary and Bill Clinton made money in 2015 largely from paid speeches, a practice that has drawn the ire of liberal Democrats who have rallied around Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign.
    Bill Clinton delivered 22 paid speeches in 2015 for $5,250,000. Fifteen of these speeches were already reported in Clinton's 2015 financial disclosure report. Incomes from the seven that had not been reported total $1,665,000.
    Hillary Clinton delivered six paid speeches in 2015 for $1,475,500. These speeches included three in Canada, two in California and one in New Jersey -- all of which were already reported in previous financial disclosure forms.
    In total, Bill and Hillary Clinton gave 28 speeches in 2015 for $6,725,500.
    In releasing the personal financial disclosure, the Clinton campaign slammed presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump, who filed his personal financial disclosure form but has yet to release his tax returns.
    "Despite Donald Trump's boasting, submitting his personal financial disclosure form is no breakthrough for transparency. It is a legal requirement for anyone running for president," said Christina Reynolds, Clinton's rapid response spokeswoman. "The true test for Donald Trump is whether he will adhere to the precedent followed by every presidential candidate in the modern era and make his tax returns available, as Hillary Clinton has done."
    The presumptive Republican nominee said Tuesday that his revenue had increased by about $190 million and that his net worth has now eclipsed $10 billion. Trump, who made fortunes in New York real estate before entering politics, said his income on his new personal financial disclosure form exceeded $557 million.
    "I filed my PFD, which I am proud to say is the largest in the history of the (Federal Election Commission)," Trump said in a statement, noting that Sanders, a far poorer presidential aspirant, had requested an extension for his form. "This is the difference between a businessman and the all talk, no action politicians that have failed the American people for far too long."
    Clinton's campaign has kept pressure on Trump to release his taxes, including sending supporters a petition on Tuesday.
    Earlier this month, Clinton suggested that Trump was hiding something by not releasing his taxes.
    "When you run for president, especially when you become the nominee, that is kind of expected," Clinton said at an event in New Jersey. "My husband and I have released 33 years of tax returns, we've got eight years on our website right now. So you have got to ask yourself, why does he not release them?"