Incredible new views of an over-photographed city

Hong Kong (CNN)Many tourists, photographers and even residents have fallen in love with Hong Kong's endless energy and tangle.

The stacks and layers of Lego-like buildings, which gave rise to the now-hackneyed term "residensity," are a popular subject for Instagram pros and amateurs alike.
The problem is, it's a challenge to come up with unique, breathtaking views of an almost over-photographed city.
    Which is why we were blown away when we first laid eyes on the work of photographer Andy Yeung.
    "Hong Kong is like a person who never lacks inner resources," says the born-and-raised Hong Konger, adding that he likes to cull insights and inspiration from the familiar.
    His intimacy with the city means his ideas for original shots are inexhaustible -- and it comes through in his photos.
    "Even though Hong Kong is such a small place, geographically speaking, you can keep interacting with it without feeling bored," Yeung says.
    Drones helped him achieve just that in his "urban jungle" series, featured in the gallery above.
    Captured with a DJI Phantom 3 Professional drone, Yeung says this aerial perspective could show us something we already know about but rarely get to see.
    "I usually take off on the mountain peak to avoid electromagnetic interference," Yeung says.
    Yeung's personal favorite is his series called "Compact City," taken in Quarry Bay.
    His pro tips?
    It's all about timing.
    "Most of my photographs of Hong Kong were captured during the blue hour, which is the period of twilight at dawn each morning and dusk each evening," Yeung tells CNN.
    "That's when the sun is at a significant distance below the horizon and the residual, indirect sunlight takes on a predominantly blue hue.
    "Since that's when lights from the buildings in Hong Kong will be turned on, it's ideal for cityscape photography."
    Visit Andy Yeung's website for more of his work.