Michigan loss in mind, Clinton urges voters to go to the polls

Story highlights

  • Hillary Clinton urged supporters to turn out in all five states voting on Tuesday
  • Even though some public polling shows her with strong leads in states like Florida, North Carolina and Ohio

Raleigh, North Carolina (CNN)Hillary Clinton urged supporters to turn out in all five states voting on Tuesday even though some public polling shows her with strong leads in states like Florida, North Carolina and Ohio.

The Clinton campaign has grown concerned that strong public polling is making people feel like wins in North Carolina, Florida and even Ohio are in the bag.
"I feel you have got to keep working all day on Election Day and remind people how important it is to vote and don't let anybody get complacent because sometimes the public reporting of polls, somebody might say, 'My candidate is so far ahead I don't need to come out,'" Clinton said in a conversation with reporters while visiting a polling place outside Raleigh, North Carolina.
    Clinton had a polling lead going into last week's Michigan contest, but ended up losing by 2% to her Democratic presidential rival Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders. Some aides believe Clinton supporters stayed home because of the polls.
    Clinton currently has a more than 200 delegate lead over Sanders and would like to start looking towards Republican front-runner Donald Trump and other Republicans.
    On Tuesday, Clinton said it wasn't her choice when Sanders ends his campaign, but did say it benefits Democrats to start focusing on Republicans.
    "I think the numbers are adding up on in our favor, the number of delegates will continue to increase, so I am going to keep working as hard as I can," Clinton said. "But I think it is important that we really do focus on the very dangerous path that Donald Trump has laid out here, the kind of bluster and bigotry and bullying that he's exemplifying on the campaign trail is disturbing to I think the majority of Americans."
    Trump has long been one of Clinton's favorite targets. On Monday, Clinton accused him of "inciting mob violence" at his events.
    On Tuesday, Clinton downplayed the Republican's appeal to voters, noting that what he has done is win a "minority of those who choose to vote in Republican primaries and caucuses."
    "I've gotten more votes than he has already. So I do not think he represents the vast majority of Americans who are more interested in solving our problems than venting our disappointment or anger," Clinton said. "Is it going to be challenging? Of course it will be. That is true in any general election."