Severe storms, flooding target the South

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Story highlights

  • Nearly 10 million people face the threat of severe weather on Wednesday
  • A slow-moving storm system will dump up to a foot of rain
  • The flood threat remains through Thursday

(CNN)The slow-moving storm system crawling across the Deep South has dumped heavy rains and spawned flooding in some areas.

The system will continue to pump moisture into the southern states for the next few days, bringing as much as a foot of rain to major cities along the Gulf Coast. Flood watches and flood warnings are in effect for parts of nine states from Texas to Illinois, and more than 20 million people could feel the impact of the storm system.
    An additional half a foot of rain expected through Friday
    Several swift water rescues took place in the last 24 hours and 30 homes were evacuated in Bossier Parish, Louisiana, Tuesday due to rising water in the neighborhood. Flooding is the leading weather-related cause of death over the last 30 years. More than half of flood deaths each year are vehicle-related.
    Severe storms and flooding target the South
    Severe Flood Forecast for South_00000000

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    Not only will flooding be a concern, but a risk of severe weather will remain in place Wednesday and Thursday. Nearly 10 million people will have a risk of severe weather Wednesday, including residents of Houston and Shreveport. Heavy rainfall, damaging winds and isolated tornadoes will be a possibility as these slow-moving storms roll through the area.
    The severe storm risk will remain on Thursday, with cities such as New Orleans and Jackson, Mississippi, possibly feeling the impact.