Trump dominates in Michigan poll, Kasich lags

(CNN)A new poll of the Republican presidential race in Michigan shows businessman Donald Trump well ahead the field there, topping Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz who are in a tight race for second.

Trump leads in Michigan with the support of 29% of respondents, according to the poll from the Detroit Free Press and several local news stations. Cruz came in second in the poll with 19%, edging Rubio at 18%.
Ohio Gov. John Kasich -- who has been pinning his campaign hopes on a strong showing in Midwestern states -- finished last among candidates still in the race with 8%.
    On Thursday, the Detroit Free Press editorial board endorsed Kasich, knocking the rest of the field for a lack of maturity.
    "Michigan could be where a true alternative at last emerges to front-runner Donald Trump, who comes out of the Super Tuesday vote with a formidable lead in the delegate count," the editors wrote.
    "That candidate should be John Kasich, the Ohio governor who offers a heaping measure of maturity, competence and experience to a GOP race that has taken on the air of a junior high class officer's election. Kasich also possesses the temperament that can command respect both at home and abroad," they wrote.
    The Michigan poll also shows a measurable tightening in the Republican race.
    Absentee voters, who have already voted, were much more likely to support Trump than respondents who are planning to vote in the primary next week, or still making up their minds.
    Among absentee voters, Trump leads with field with 45% support, to Rubio's 14% and Cruz's 10%. That's 16 points higher than his support among all respondents, including absentee voters. Absentee voters made up 11% of those surveyed by the poll.
    The Michigan Republican primary takes place on March 8, one week before critical contests in Florida, Illinois, Missouri, North Carolina and Ohio on March 15.
    The poll surveyed 400 Michigan Republicans between February 27-29 and has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.9%.