Clinton turns to Sanders' Senate colleagues to question his preparedness

Story highlights

  • Clinton shared a stage at a YWCA in Manchester on Friday with New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, Michigan Sen. Debbie Stabenow and New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen
  • Clinton has repeatedly turned to members of the Senate to stump for her

Manchester, New Hampshire (CNN)Hillary Clinton turned to four female members of the United State Senate on Friday in New Hampshire to make her case for the presidency, and to cast her opponent, Sen. Bernie Sanders as unprepared for many aspects of the job.

Clinton shared a stage at a YWCA in Manchester with New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, Michigan Sen. Debbie Stabenow and New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen. While the women praised the Vermont senator, they also questioned his preparedness and the thesis behind his campaign: revolution.
"When folks talk about the revolution, the revolution is electing the first woman president of the United States," Stabenow said to a small but fired-up audience. "That is the revolution. And we are ready for the revolution."
Clinton followed Stabenow's lead in her brief but direct speech. Although Clinton offered Sanders a slight olive branch -- reaching out particularly to his young supporters -- she also said that Thursday night's debate in New Hampshire made it clear "there is only one candidate who is prepared to do all aspects of the job on day one."
"I want to say a word to the extraordinary people, particularly the young people, who are supporting Senator Sanders. I know you may not be for me know, but I am for you," Clinton said before repeating a pledge to make Sanders "the first call I will make" should she win the Democratic nomination.
"I look forward to working with him as a partner in the Senate," Clinton said.
Clinton also made clear on Friday that she is ready to get passed the primary, stressing that all Democrats should be more focused on making sure "we don't get a Republican back in the White House."
Clinton and her aides left last night's Democratic debate -- the first between only the former secretary of state and Sanders -- enthused about her performance, particularly her handle on foreign policy issues compared to the Vermont senator.
But there is uncertainty about whether the performance will impact polls in the first in the nation primary state, where Clinton is behind by anywhere between 20 and 30 percentage points. Clinton and her aides have tried to lower expectations in New Hampshire -- something Clinton did against on Friday -- while also pledging to fight in the state.
"I am not going to stop fighting for New Hampshire," Clinton said Friday. "I am going to keep fighting until the last vote is counted on Tuesday."
Clinton has repeatedly turned to members of the Senate -- a body where 39 out of 46 Democrats have already endorsed the former secretary of state -- to stump for her. Many members of the Senate have campaigned and raised money for her across the country, including an event last year with every female member of the Senate, except for Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren.
Even if the senators don't make the case, their message is clear: We work closely with Sanders and decided to back Clinton.
Sanders has acknowledged his lack of a Senate endorsement, but spins the fact as proof he is running as an anti-establishment candidate.
Clinton clearly appreciated the support from her former colleagues on Friday. After Clinton's speech, the five women, along with activist Lilly Ledbetter and Emily's List President Stephanie Schriock, linked arms, swayed and sung along to "Fight Song," the Clinton campaign's anthem.