$1M accident costs sub captain his job

Story highlights

  • A guided-missile submarine hit a buoy and grounded on November 25
  • The accident did $1 million in damage to the USS Georgia

(CNN)A November accident has cost a U.S. submarine commander his job and taxpayers at least $1 million, the Navy says.

The USS Georgia, an Ohio-class guided missile submarine, struck a channel buoy and grounded as it was returning to port in Kings Bay, Georgia, on November 25, the Navy said.
Capt. Dave Adams of the Georgia was relieved of command on Monday by Rear Adm. Randy Crites, commander of Submarine Group 10 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay.
    "Commanding officers are held to the highest standards of professional conduct and accept the responsibility of command with full regard for its consequences," the Navy statement said.
    Adams accepted full responsibility for the accident in a statement to the The Brunswick News near the sub base in southern Georgia.
    "The actions that hazarded Georgia upon a scheduled return to port in the dark on the morning of 25 Nov. were mine alone. I ask that my lapses not be used to denigrate the terrific service of the sailors and families of Georgia Blue. After 30 years of serving in the world's finest Navy, my only regret is that I will miss sailing with them again to stand against our nation's enemies," Adams' statement said, according to the newspaper's report.
    Subs like the Georgia have two crews, designated "Gold" and "Blue," which alternate operating the vessels to maximize their time at sea. Adams commanded the "Blue" crew.
    The Navy said the accident caused about $1 million in damage to the 18,000-ton, 560-foot-long nuclear submarine. The service said in December that the damage was limited to the exterior of the sub and there was no water intrusion.
    The Georgia was commissioned in 1982 as a ballistic-missile sub and converted to a guided-missile boat in 2004.
    The Navy said Adams was being reassigned within Submarine Group 10 and the investigation into the accident remains open.