Star Jones to stump for Clinton in South Carolina

Story highlights

  • Star Jones is expected to speak on issues such as gun control, equal pay and affordable health care and childcare
  • In a CNN/ORC poll released last week, 59% of black voters in South Carolina say they back Clinton

Columbia, South Carolina (CNN)Talk show host Star Jones will come to Greenville, South Carolina, on Saturday to campaign on behalf of Hillary Clinton, part of a larger push by the Democratic front-runner to attract black voters, a Clinton aide said Wednesday.

Jones will join a local legislator for a community forum, and she is expected to speak on issues such as gun control, equal pay and affordable health care and childcare, the campaign said.
"African-Americans for Hillary launch will highlight issues important to the African-American community, including a criminal justice platform, and help strengthen Hillary's support in the community in Southern states with African-American populations," the Clinton aide said.
    The aide added that the African-American vote is "critical in the Palmetto State and the campaign will work hard to earn the support of African-Americans."
    Next Friday, Clinton will return to South Carolina as the keynote speaker for the Charleston branch of the NAACP's Freedom Fund Banquet dinner.
    In a CNN/ORC poll released last week, 59% of black voters in South Carolina say they back Clinton, compared to 27% for Joe Biden, who announced on Wednesday he would not seek the White House, and just 4% for Sanders. Among white voters, Sanders has the edge, 44% to 31% for Clinton and 22% for Biden. Without Biden in the race, it's a near-even split among whites, 48% Clinton to 47% Sanders, while blacks break 84% to Clinton to just 7% for Sanders.
    In South Carolina, Clinton's advantage stems largely from Sanders' unpopularity with black voters, who made up a majority of Democratic primary voters in the state in 2008, the last time there was a competitive Democratic primary. Back then, black voters broke 78% for Barack Obama to 19% for Clinton.
    On Tuesday, the campaign released a list of African-American mayors supporting Clinton, which included Mayors Kasim Reed of Atlanta, Michael Nutter of Philadelphia and Steve Benjamin of Columbia.
    Clinton's South Carolina operation has had many surrogates down to the first-in-the-south state to campaign on her behalf, including campaign manager John Podesta and former Democratic National Committee Chairman Howard Dean.
    So far, the national campaign has worked hard to characterize its supporters in sweeping endorsement lists: Women and Girls for Hillary, Mayors for Hillary, and Students for Hillary, an upcoming list that will be announced in the next week or so, the campaign said.