Tom Brady sketch artist gets another shot

Jane Rosenberg's first courtroom portrait of Tom Brady, left, drew jeers; the second looks more like the QB.

Story highlights

  • Jane Rosenberg was criticized for her interpretation this month
  • Her sketch from Monday's hearing got a better reception

(CNN)The woman who made handsome NFL quarterback Tom Brady look like a cross between "Quasimodo," "Gollum" and "ET" is back, and her new sketch of Brady turned out, well, pretty good.

Courtroom sketch artist Jane Rosenberg was taken to task online in early August for mangling her portrait of Brady at a Deflategate hearing in a New York courtroom.
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During Monday's round of legal wrangling before U.S. District Judge Richard Berman, Rosenberg again drew Brady, only this time she got his angular jaw, chin dimple and dark blond locks right, by the Internet's consensus.
    "Behold, a Tom Brady courtroom sketch in which his face isn't melting," tweeted the tech site Mashable.
    "Court artist tries sketching Tom Brady again -- and nails it," proclaimed the Los Angeles Times.
    Before the hearing, Rosenberg told the New York Daily News she was nervous to sketch Brady again.
    "There's a lot of pressure on me. A lot of eyeballs on me. I just hope my hands can move, period. I know I'm not going to have any sleep tonight," she said. "I still might blow it; anything could happen."
    She posed for the paper with a portrait of Brady that she had carefully sketched over a couple of days.
    Rosenberg said she was sorry last time around for making the quarterback look less than perfect.
    "I apologize for not making him look pretty enough to the world," she said. "Tom Brady is a very good-looking guy."
    Rosenberg, who has also sketched famous court cases involving Bernie Madoff, Sean Combs and Al Sharpton, said in her own defense that Brady was a small part of a large pastel composition, and accuracy is difficult in that situation.
    "I try to capture somebody's essence quickly, so it's not going to be perfect," she said.
    Her first effort at capturing Brady's essence resulted in a meme storm.