Amanda Knox: Keep fighting for your innocence

Story highlights

  • Amanda Knox: Unlike me, there are many innocent people who do not find the clear, satisfying justice of exoneration
  • Knox: Before the world can make your innocence official, someone must fight for it; the Innocence Project helps many

Amanda Knox is the author of "Waiting to Be Heard," which tells the story of her studies in Italy, prosecution in a murder case and ultimate acquittal. The book is out in paperback this week with a new afterword. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.

(CNN)The first time I attended the Innocence Network Conference in 2014, I had to be coaxed into going. Greg Hampikian, director of the Innocence Project in Idaho, informed me that not only was the conference going to be held in Portland, Oregon -- a mere three-hour drive from where I lived in Seattle -- but it was also about time that I met the crew. It's all love! Hampikian promised. But I wasn't sure.

The notoriety of my case made me feel claustrophobic. Could I handle walking into a room full of hundreds of people who might judge me? More importantly, I was not yet exonerated. I had, in fact, been very recently re-convicted. Did I even belong? At first glance, the conference was not only a nerve-wracking ride I had never been on, but I didn't know if I met the height requirement.
The Innocence Network, it turned out, had a term for this: "still fighting." That is, not "officially innocent."
    Unlike me, there are many innocent people who do not find the clear, satisfying justice of exoneration. Sometimes, a prosecutor can be made to see that there were deficiencies with a conviction, but may not believe -- or want to admit -- that the conviction was wrong.
    In such cases, the Innocence Project can help people achieve freedom only by reaching an agreement with the prosecutor short of full exoneration, such as for "time served." If the client agrees, she is freed, but she faces, as I was facing, the prospect of having to suffer indefinitely the disparity between a recognized, official verdict of guilt and the unrecognized, unofficial fact of one's innocence.
    Convinced by Hampikian's optimism, I did attend. And I'm so glad I did because he was right: the people involved in the Innocence Project are incredible. They embraced me as a little sister. They assured me I was safe, that nothing was expected of me, that everyone was just pleased to finally get to know me.
    I found a community brimming with love and understanding. That community has supported, and continues to support, me and countless others wrongfully convicted. The innocent individual who has not yet been exonerated -- even more than the exoneree -- is the symbol of the Innocence Project, because before the world can make your innocence official, someone must fight for it.
    At the time of the case against Raffaele Sollecito and me in Italy, there was no Innocence Project in Italy. There was no organization that championed individual cases of actual innocence and advocated -- through research, education and legislation -- against the causes of wrongful conviction The Italian Innocence Project exists as of 2015 and consists of just two legal experts, for now.
    But the Innocence Network, the cooperative conglomeration of state-by-state Innocence Projects here in the United States, has existed since the first project was founded by Barry Scheck and Peter Neufeld at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law at Yeshiva University in New York City in 1992. Since its founding, 329 people have been exonerated in the United States, 20 of whom were on death row. The Innocence Project was directly involved in 176 of those cases. Equally important, it has helped to find 140 real perpetrators, bringing justice to the victims.
    The Innocence Project not only works to overturn wrongful convictions of individual innocents, but also analyzes the causes of convictions that have been proven wrongful. It works to implement best practices and legislation that would help prevent future wrongful convictions, including: allowing convicts to carry out post-conviction testing, such as DNA testing; preservation of evidence; reforming eyewitness practices; recording interrogations to protect against false confessions/admissions; and abolishing the death penalty.
    Finally, the organization works to pass legislation that would provide financial compensation to the victims of wrongful conviction who, along with their freedom, lost their financial security to years of debt and inertia.
    The victims of wrongful conviction are deserving of justice and help. The dedicated persons involved in Innocence Projects throughout the United States, and now throughout the world, provide the necessary resources for those wrongfully convicted to be set free.
    They also provide the crucial network of support for those set free to reclaim their lives in freedom—something I was reminded of when I attended the recent Innocence Network conference in 2015, fully exonerated and eager to give back the support I have received to those who are still fighting.