Obama pitching initiatives ahead of State of the Union speech

Obama pitches community college plan
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Story highlights

  • At FTC, Obama will lay out proposals and executive action on identity theft, Internet privacy and technology in schools
  • In Iowa, he will focus on increasing access to high-speed broadband across the country
  • He already has announced proposals during trips to Michigan, Arizona and Tennessee

Washington (CNN)Cybersecurity and Internet access will be themes in the coming week as President Barack Obama highlights the agenda he will be emphasizing in his State of the Union address.

Obama will meet with congressional leaders from both parties Tuesday to "discuss a wide range of issues including places where he hopes we can work together to grow the economy and protect our national security," a White House official told CNN.
This comes just after the House of Representatives voted to approve the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, but its fate is uncertain in the Senate. The White House has promised a veto of that measure if it reaches the President's desk.
    On Monday, the President will visit the Federal Trade Commission, where he will lay out proposals and executive action on identity theft, Internet privacy and technology in schools, the official said.
    Next week, Obama will speak about the government's efforts to work with the private sector on cybersecurity and will travel to Iowa, where he will focus on increasing access to high-speed broadband across the country.
    This is all part of a new tactic by the White House to build support for its initiatives before the annual January 20 address. Ordinarily, presidents have held these types of events after the speech.
    In the past week, the President visited Michigan, Arizona and Tennessee, where he announced proposals focused on the economy and helping the middle class -- highlighting a strengthened auto industry, policies aimed at making homes more affordable, and a plan to make community college free for most students.
    But Republicans -- such as Sens. Bob Corker and Lamar Alexander, who accompanied the President on his trip Friday to their home state of Tennessee -- have already voiced some skepticism.
    Asked whether he would support Obama's community college proposal, Corker said "Oh no, no, no, no, no," instead urging other states to do something similar to the President's initiative rather than create "a whole new bureaucratic federal program."