Skip to main content

Cricket Australia trademarks '63 not out' after death of its star Phillip Hughes

By Paul Gittings, CNN
updated 4:35 PM EST, Sat December 27, 2014
Australian Test cricket captain Michael Clarke reacts as he arrives for the funeral of Australian batsman Phil Hughes in his hometown of Macksville in northern New South Wales on December 3, 2014. Hughes died November 27, two days after being hit by a cricket ball during a match. Australian Test cricket captain Michael Clarke reacts as he arrives for the funeral of Australian batsman Phil Hughes in his hometown of Macksville in northern New South Wales on December 3, 2014. Hughes died November 27, two days after being hit by a cricket ball during a match.
HIDE CAPTION
Remembering Phil Hughes
Remembering Phil Hughes
Remembering Phil Hughes
Remembering Phil Hughes
Remembering Phil Hughes
Remembering Phil Hughes
Remembering Phil Hughes
Remembering Phil Hughes
Remembering Phil Hughes
Remembering Phil Hughes
Remembering Phil Hughes
Remembering Phil Hughes
Remembering Phil Hughes
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
>
>>
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Cricket Australia trademarks term "63 not out"
  • Score reached by Phillip Hughes in his final innings
  • Governing body says it is to prevent people cashing in
  • Australia in strong position in third Test against India

Follow us at @WorldSportCNN and like us on Facebook

(CNN) -- Cricket Australia has trademarked the term "63 not out" in an attempt to prevent people cashing in on the death of its Test batsman Phillip Hughes.

The 25-year-old Hughes died after being hit on the head by a ball in a domestic match in Sydney last month.

He had reached the score of 63 runs when the tragic accident occurred.

Read: Australia cricketer Hughes dies after freak accident

His untimely death stunned the sporting world and the scheduled first Test between Australia and India in Adelaide had to be postponed as his teammates struggled to cope with their grief at his passing.

Tributes on social media initially centered around a campaign #putyourbatsout on Twitter as thousands of people photographed cricket bats in unusual places to mark their respect for Hughes.

But 63 not out also became an iconic symbol of the batsman's life and when the first Test eventually took place, spectators were asked to stand for 63 seconds of applause before the start.

Australian players reaching that score during their innings also marked its significance with gestures and many in the crowd wore T-shirts or held up signs with 63 not out featured.

Australia shocked by cricketer's death
Cricketer hit by pitch, collapses

Read: Clarke leads tributes at funeral of cricketer Hughes

However, cricket authorities in Australia and Hughes' representatives have become concerned about the volume of unlicensed memorabilia, mostly clothing and stickers, and the use of online auction sites to promote the various offerings.

Cricket Australia said the agreement was purely "defensive" to prevent others trying to exploit Hughes' memory.

"CA registered the trademark in conjunction with Phillip's management to prevent others trying to exploit Phillip's memory," a spokesperson told CNN.

"There was some evidence of that starting," it added.

The entire Australia-India series has been played out with continuous reminders of Hughes. The Australian team is wearing shirts with the number 408 stitched in.

Hughes was the 408th player to represent his country in Test matches, the highest level of international cricket.

Cricketer Phil Hughes dies
Michael Clarke's emotional eulogy

Australia's players, especially those closest to Hughes, have also produced inspired performances against India, taking a 2-0 lead and dominating the Third Test which started on Boxing Day in Melbourne.

Read: Captain's knock from Smith at MCG

Stand-in captain Steve Smith reached his Test-best 192 on Saturday as the home team posted a formidable first innings of 530.

He was supported by innings from Brad Haddin (55), Mitchell Johnson (28) and Ryan Harris (74) as Australia scored quickly against the Indian bowling attack.

India fought back to reach 108 for one wicket by the close, but its chancing of winning the match and attempting to square the four-match series is effectively over.

Read: Is cricket safe?

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 6:38 AM EST, Tue November 18, 2014
Click through our gallery of the most dramatic moments from the world of sport.
updated 12:06 PM EDT, Mon July 28, 2014
Whisper it quietly, but after years of foreign domination the prospect of a French winner of the Tour de France is more than just a mere pipe dream.
updated 9:21 AM EDT, Mon July 28, 2014
Seven years ago Steve Way was a 20 per day smoker and weighed a hefty 104 kg, but he led the marathon at the 2014 Commonwealth Games.
updated 9:17 AM EDT, Fri July 25, 2014
After just one day of competition, a new sport has emerged at the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow: snapping selfies with the Queen.
updated 4:48 PM EDT, Fri July 25, 2014
Inspirational cyclist Joanna Rowsell added another gold to her growing collection in the individual pursuit at the Commonwealth Games.
updated 12:04 AM EDT, Thu July 24, 2014
At the opening ceremony of the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, an actor upstaged the Queen by kissing a male dancer.
updated 8:00 AM EDT, Wed May 7, 2014
Of course not. But former Fulham owner Mohamed Al Fayed seems to think the removal of Michael Jackson's statue was a very "bad" idea.
updated 12:36 PM EDT, Wed May 7, 2014
Second-tier French side Clermont Foot appoint Helena Costa -- the country's first ever professional female coach of a male team.
updated 1:33 PM EDT, Fri April 25, 2014
The All Blacks and their fans are focused on one thing, says Dan Carter: becoming the first rugby nation to win back-to-back World Cups.
updated 9:08 AM EDT, Fri April 4, 2014
The 2002 bomb attacks in Bali had many victims -- including a touring rugby team from Hong Kong.
Photographer Danny Lyon spent three days with Muhammad Ali in 1972 and shares his best photos and memories of the champ.
updated 7:54 AM EST, Tue February 25, 2014
With a growing audience boosted by the drama of ice hockey on show in Sochi at the Winter Olympics, can the sport capitalize on its popularity?
updated 6:25 AM EST, Mon January 20, 2014
Her paintings may sell for thousands of dollars, but she is best known for a modeling shot 50 years ago that helped launch a business empire.
ADVERTISEMENT