With an eye to 2016, Jeb Bush knocks Clinton

Jeb Bush on economic growth
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Story highlights

  • While campaigning in Colorado, Bush hit Clinton over her comments that businesses don't create jobs
  • Clinton later walked back those remarks saying tax breaks for corporations don't spur economic growth
  • But that hasn't stopped Bush and Sen. Rand Paul from hitting Clinton over the quote
Jeb Bush says he hasn't made up his mind yet on a 2016 presidential campaign, but that didn't stop him Wednesday from taking a thinly veiled shot at the top contender for the Democratic nomination.
Bush, the former governor of Florida, didn't mention former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton by name, but Clinton was clearly the butt of his remarks in Colorado:
"This last week I saw something that was breathtaking. A candidate, a former Secretary of State, who was campaigning in Massachusetts where she said that 'don't let them tell you that businesses creates jobs,'" Bush said, referring to a line Clinton made last week.
While campaigning in Massachusetts Friday, Clinton told the crowd, "Don't let anybody tell you that it's corporations and businesses that create jobs," adding that trickle-down economic policies have "failed rather spectacularly."
Clinton backpedaled on those remarks three days later explaining that "our economy grows when businesses and entrepreneurs create good-paying jobs here in America where workers and families are empowered to build from the bottom up and the middle out" instead of handing "tax breaks to corporations that outsource jobs."
Republicans have since pounced on the remarks and the former Florida governor also used Clinton's line to build on his own economic vision.
"Well, the problem in America today is that not enough jobs are being created. They are created by businesses where people's income rise where they can live a life of purpose and meaning independent of government. That should be the mission. And the only way that we do that is to create a climate of high sustained economic growth where everybody, everybody in this country has a chance at earned success," Bush said.
And while that might sound like a stump speech, Bush insists he hasn't made up his mind yet, though he is seriously considering a bid and has met with top donors.
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His son George P. Bush even said it's "more than likely that he's giving this a serious thought in moving forward" last weekend. His father is expected to make a decision after the holiday season.
The former governor isn't the only potential GOP presidential candidate who knocked Clinton this week over the jobs comments.
Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky slammed Clinton earlier this week while campaigning for Republican candidates in Kansas.
"Hillary Clinton comes up and she says, 'Businesses don't create jobs.' Anybody here think businesses don't create jobs?" Paul said, according to Buzzfeed. "I'm here today to endorse Pat Roberts and Sam Brownback, because you know what? They know that businesses do create jobs, and I hope you know that too."
Paul also used his time at the mic to tie Clinton's comments to a comment from President Barack Obama on the 2012 campaign trail that was used repeatedly by Republicans to attack the president during his reelection bid.
"The president says, 'you didn't build that, it just sort of happened,'" Paul said.
Obama's comment that "if you've got a business, you didn't build that" during a campaign rally in 2012 came while Obama was talking about the importance of infrastructure and public services.
The remark caused the Obama campaign quite a headache in 2012, and it looks like Clinton's comments on jobs could have the same impact in 2016, if she were to run.