Celeb lawyer takes on Google over hacked, nude photos

Actress Jennifer Lawrence is reportedly one of dozens of celebs who had their iCloud accounts hacked.

Story highlights

  • Marty Singer is accusing Google of acting "like the NFL"
  • He is demanding that the images be removed
  • Google is disputing the accusations
An attorney who says he is representing more than a dozen celebrities whose iCloud accounts were hacked and nude photos stolen fired off a strongly worded letter on Wednesday to Google: Immediately remove all the images from your platforms or face a $100 million lawsuit.
Marty Singer -- whose past client roster includes Britney Spears, Kim Kardashian, Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt -- sent a letter to Google on behalf of several female "actresses, models, and athletes whose confidential, personal, private photos and videos" were stolen in late August.
Stars including Jennifer Lawrence, Kate Upton and Rihanna have reportedly been part of a group of more than 100 who had their accounts hacked and images stolen. Attorney Singer criticized Google for its "despicable, reprehensible conduct in not only failing to act expeditiously and responsibly to remove the Images, but in knowingly accommodating, facilitating and perpetuating the unlawful conduct."
Hack casts shadow on Apple launch
Hack casts shadow on Apple launch

    JUST WATCHED

    Hack casts shadow on Apple launch

MUST WATCH

Hack casts shadow on Apple launch 04:25
Is your data safe in the iCloud?
Is your data safe in the iCloud?

    JUST WATCHED

    Is your data safe in the iCloud?

MUST WATCH

Is your data safe in the iCloud? 03:33
According to Singer, Google was notified that the images were stolen on more than a dozen occasions. He accuses the company of refusing to act to remove all of the images from its platforms pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. T
The letter notes other website operators and host providers -- including Twitter -- have accommodated take-down demands, but claims Google "has recklessly allowed these blatant violations to continue in conscious disregard of our clients' rights." The letter specifically references images that are still available on Google sites including BlogSpot and YouTube.
Singer's letter says: "Because the victims are celebrities with valuable publicity rights, you do nothing -- nothing but collect millions of dollars in advertising revenue from your co-conspirator advertising partners as you seek to capitalize on this scandal rather than quash it. Like the NFL, which turned a blind eye while its players assaulted and victimized women and children, Google has turned a blind eye while its sites repeatedly exploit and victimize these women."
Google for its part is disputing the accusations.
A spokesperson for the search engine giant told CNN, "We've removed tens of thousands of pictures -- within hours of the requests being made -- and we have closed hundreds of accounts. The Internet is used for many good things. Stealing people's private photos is not one of them."
Singer has not disclosed who he is specifically representing in this case. The FBI investigation into the incidents is ongoing.