Rand Paul: 'I am not opposed to birth control'

Rand Paul: 'Not opposed to birth control'
Rand Paul: 'Not opposed to birth control'

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    Rand Paul: 'Not opposed to birth control'

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Rand Paul: 'Not opposed to birth control' 00:23

Story highlights

  • Rand Paul says he's not opposed to Plan B, an emergency contraception pill
  • Paul has previously introduced a bill that defines life at conception
  • Some social conservatives consider Plan B an abortion drug
Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul said he is not opposed to Plan B, the emergency contraception commonly known as the morning-after pill.
Paul, a likely Republican presidential candidate, sponsored an anti-abortion bill in 2013 that defines life as beginning at fertilization. Democrats say the so-called "Personhood" measure would outlaw Plan B and other emergency contraceptives.
Paul was asked about the matter during an appearance at the College of Charleston, one stop on a day-long college tour of South Carolina.
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"If life starts at conception, should medicine that prevents conception like Plan B be legal?," a woman asked him during a question-and-answer session here.
Paul at first gave a terse answer: "I am not opposed to birth control," he said.
After a pause, Paul elaborated. "That's basically what Plan B is," he said. "Plan B is taking two birth control pills in the morning and two in the evening, and I am not opposed to that."
A number of prominent social conservatives have condemned the morning-after pill as on-demand abortion drugs, sometimes confusing the contraceptive with RU-486, which can be used to induce abortion.
Paul stood by his answer after the event, when asked about the exchange by reporters.
"Plan B is taking birth control," he said. "I am not against birth control and I don't know many Republicans who would be indicating that they are against birth control."
Paul also visited the University of South Carolina in Columbia and also made a stop in Myrtle Beach to meet with local Republicans.