Osama bin Laden's son-in-law sentenced to life in prison

Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, in an image from the Saudi-owned Middle East Broadcasting Center.

Story highlights

  • Sulaiman Abu Ghaith gets a life sentence for conspiring to kill Americans, supporting terrorists
  • Prosecutors say he aided al Qaeda as spokesman
  • He also was a recruiter, helping "restore al Qaeda's trove of new terrorists," prosecutors say
Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, was sentenced to life in prison Tuesday, said Jerika Richardson, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney's Office in Manhattan.
In March, he was found guilty of helping al Qaeda terrorists conspire to kill Americans and providing material support to terrorists.
"Justice has been served," U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said in a statement. "This outcome ensures that Sulaiman Abu (Ghaith), a senior member of al Qaeda and an associate of Usama bin Laden, will never again set foot outside a prison cell."
The life term was imposed by U.S. District Judge Lewis A. Kaplan. Authorities described Abu Ghaith as bin Laden's "propaganda minister" and the "face and voice of al Qaeda in the days and weeks after the 9/11 attacks."
At his trial, federal prosecutors said Abu Ghaith, a Kuwaiti cleric, played a crucial role as the organization's principal mouthpiece and recruiter, helping "restore al Qaeda's trove of new terrorists" as deadly missions turned its members into martyrs.
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"He was more than just Usama bin Laden's propaganda minister. Within hours after the devastating 9/11 attacks, Abu Ghayth was using his position in al Qaeda's homicidal hierarchy to persuade others to pledge themselves to al Qaeda in the cause of murdering more Americans," Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said in a prepared statement after the guilty verdict was announced.
Abu Ghaith, 48, was flown to the United States a year ago from Jordan and charged with conspiring to kill Americans.
The government did not allege that he served an operational function or had a direct hand in carrying out the attacks.
Bharara said at the time of Abu Ghaith's conviction: "Like the others who have faced terrorism charges in Manhattan's federal courthouse before him, Abu Ghayth received a fair trial, after which a unanimous jury rendered its verdict, justly holding him accountable for his crimes. We hope this verdict brings some small measure of comfort to the families of the victims of al Qaeda's murderous designs."
In a statement, George Venizelos, assistant director in charge of the FBI's New York field office, likened Abu Ghaith to "a consigliere for the mob or the chief of staff to a corrupt foreign leader" and said he was a "spokesman, confidant and senior adviser" to bin Laden's organization.
Abu Ghaith "looked to better al Qaeda's reputation at every turn, offering advice and counsel to the organization's senior leadership. He encouraged others to abandon the true tenets of their faith, swearing bayat to the twisted ideology of al Qaeda," Venizelos said, using the Islamic word for allegiance.
The trial was held blocks from the site of Manhattan's World Trade Center, and several survivors of the attacks and family members of victims attended.
Bin Laden spiritual adviser
Abu Ghaith testified that he never joined the ranks of al Qaeda and assisted bin Laden only as a speaker on spiritual topics.
Known in the Persian Gulf region as a religious scholar and fiery orator, Abu Ghaith met the al Qaeda leader in Afghanistan in June 2001, according to testimony. He denied advance knowledge of the 9/11 attacks but said he'd heard talk that "something big" was about to happen. He moved his family from Afghanistan to Kuwait days before the September 11, 2001, attacks on New York's World Trade Center and the Pentagon.
Just after the attacks, the al Qaeda leader summoned Abu Ghaith to his remote mountain hiding place and asked him to help "deliver a message to the world" on the organization's behalf, the religious scholar testified.
After his arrest last year in Jordan, activists and legislators sparred over where to try Abu Ghaith, with some calling for the case to be heard in a military courtroom at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Instead, the trial took place amid extra security measures at the U.S. District Court in Manhattan.
The jury watched videos produced after the meeting with the al Qaeda leader, of Abu Ghaith making passionate calls for further attacks on Americans, flanked by bin Laden on one side and an AK-47 rifle on the other.
He called for fellow Muslims to "terrorize the infidels" and vowed the "storm of airplanes will not abate," a phrase he said on the stand was given to him in "bullet points" provided by bin Laden for the speeches.
Abu Ghaith's attorney, Stan Cohen, accused prosecutors of using 9/11 imagery in lieu of evidence of his client's guilt and told the jurors that he counted 172 references to bin Laden and 9/11 in the first half of the prosecution's closing argument.
"It was intended to sweep you away in anguish and pain and to ask for retaliation. It was intended to make you look away from the evidence," Cohen told the panel. He said none of the government's witnesses conclusively tied his client to terrorism-related activities, including a terrorism specialist with the FBI and two cooperating former al Qaeda members.