Electrifying photos of lightning

Story highlights

  • Summer produces some spectacular lightning and it shows in the photos
  • Use a tripod and a wireless remote to capture lightning photos, NWS suggests
  • But remember, photographing storms can be dangerous, so stay out of harm's way

When a photographer is at the right place at the right time, a lightning show can be absolutely magical.

Seattle photographer Tim Durkan remembers the time he stood in a rainstorm for 90 minutes waiting for the perfect lightning shot. His clothes and his camera were soaked, but he said he loved the experience.

"The crowd of about 50 people were literally cheering each and every lightning strike!" Durkan said, describing the group of amazed photographers.

Watch lightning electrify NYC skyline
Watch lightning electrify NYC skyline

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Watch lightning electrify NYC skyline 01:03
Lightning knocks man to the ground
Lightning knocks man to the ground

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Lightning Safety
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Lightning Safety 01:23

While the lightning that comes with summer storms can be some of the most beautiful natural phenomena to photograph, these storms can be dangerous.

Remember: If you hear thunder, lightning is close enough to strike you. You can reduce your risk by setting up your camera on a tripod and operating it with a wireless remote trigger while you remain inside your home or vehicle, said National Weather Service lightning safety expert John Jensenius.

The National Weather Service has compiled a list of lightning safety tips here.

Have you captured an incredible photo of lightning? Let's see what you've got. Share your best images with CNN iReport.