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Submerge into mystic realm of the underwater museum

<i>Ring of children, Grenada</i><!-- -->
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</br>In the shallow waters off the coast of Cancun in Mexico lies an underwater field of figures. Colorful sponges cover their stony faces and layers of vibrant coral grow around their shape. <!-- -->
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</br>This is <a href='http://musacancun.org/english/' target='_blank'>Museo Subacuático de Arte</a>, the world's first underwater museum created by British sculptor<a href='http://www.underwatersculpture.com/' target='_blank'> Jason deCaires Taylor</a> with the idea to make art and the marine environment interact. He covers his exhibits in cement that attracts coral growth, then submerges them to the ocean floor, letting tropical coral overtake their surface and eventually form a new reef. <!-- -->
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</br>In this photo, statues that represent a ring of children have been placed in an area where two currents meet in order to symbolize human adaptability to new surroundings: "Some of the currents provided nutrients to one side of the circle, and the other side didn't get the same amount of nutrition," says Taylor. "so it became about how these children evolved in their surrounding and how we're all united in the circle," he adds. <!-- -->
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</br>By <strong><a href='https://twitter.com/M_Veselinovic' target='_blank'>Milena Veselinovic</a></strong>, for CNN

Ring of children, Grenada

In the shallow waters off the coast of Cancun in Mexico lies an underwater field of figures. Colorful sponges cover their stony faces and layers of vibrant coral grow around their shape.

This is Museo Subacuático de Arte, the world's first underwater museum created by British sculptor Jason deCaires Taylor with the idea to make art and the marine environment interact. He covers his exhibits in cement that attracts coral growth, then submerges them to the ocean floor, letting tropical coral overtake their surface and eventually form a new reef.

In this photo, statues that represent a ring of children have been placed in an area where two currents meet in order to symbolize human adaptability to new surroundings: "Some of the currents provided nutrients to one side of the circle, and the other side didn't get the same amount of nutrition," says Taylor. "so it became about how these children evolved in their surrounding and how we're all united in the circle," he adds.

By Milena Veselinovic, for CNN