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When glamor and mud collide: A match made in Glastonbury

Every year for one weekend in June, a little city with a party-loving populace of 200,000 pops-up on a dairy farm in Somerset, south-west England. <!-- -->
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</br>Welcome to Glastonbury Festival, which this this weekend included performances from the likes of Dolly Parton, Metallica, and Lana Del Ray - among a cosmos of stars scattered across 100 stages. <!-- -->
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</br>But almost as much as the music, Glastonbury is known for the rampant swells of mud churned up as rain meets the stomp of wellies. It can make for an alarming spectacle but, increasingly, Britain's seasoned festival-goers have become masters of making the most of a mucky situation. Here's how. <!-- -->
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</br><i>Original photos by </i><i><a href='http://www.eighteenthirtynine.com/' target='_blank'>Robert Logan.</a></i><i> Words by </i><i><a href='https://twitter.com/George_Web' target='_blank'>George Webster</a></i><!-- -->
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Every year for one weekend in June, a little city with a party-loving populace of 200,000 pops-up on a dairy farm in Somerset, south-west England.

Welcome to Glastonbury Festival, which this this weekend included performances from the likes of Dolly Parton, Metallica, and Lana Del Ray - among a cosmos of stars scattered across 100 stages.

But almost as much as the music, Glastonbury is known for the rampant swells of mud churned up as rain meets the stomp of wellies. It can make for an alarming spectacle but, increasingly, Britain's seasoned festival-goers have become masters of making the most of a mucky situation. Here's how.

Original photos by Robert Logan. Words by George Webster