Second Bowe Bergdahl film project revealed: 'America's Last Prisoner of War'

Story highlights

  • Fox Searchlight's film will be based on Rolling Stone's "America's Last Prisoner of War"
  • Writer and director Todd Field is best known for "In the Bedroom" and "Little Children"
  • "Hurt Locker," "Zero Dark Thirty" director Kathryn Bigelow is also working on a Bergdahl film
  • Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl was released after five years in captivity in Afghanistan

Hollywood will produce at least two versions of the controversial story of U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.

Fox Searchlight Pictures confirmed Wednesday that it will make a movie based on the 2012 Rolling Stone article "America's Last Prisoner of War."

The announcement came a day after the Oscar-winning team of director Kathryn Bigelow and screenwriter Mark Boal revealed they would make a film about Bergdahl, the American soldier who recently returned to the United States after five years as a prisoner of the Taliban in Afghanistan.

'Hurt Locker' team to take on Bergdahl story

The Fox Searchlight film will be written and directed by Todd Field, best known for his Oscar-nominated movies "In the Bedroom" and "Little Children," studio spokesman Russell Nelson said.

Bergdahl and his family have not given up any of their life rights for the screenplay, Nelson said. But journalist Michael Hastings, who was killed in a Los Angeles car crash a year ago, had close access to Bergdahl's parents when he wrote the Rolling Stone article.

Bigelow and Boal teamed up on the Iraq war film "The Hurt Locker," which won six Oscars, and the Osama bin Laden search movie "Zero Dark Thirty," which earned one Oscar.

    Army general to start investigating how, why Bowe Bergdahl left base

    Bergdahl went missing from his post in Afghanistan's Paktika province in June 2009. He was released to U.S. forces on May 31 in a controversial trade for five Taliban figures who had been held at the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

    An Army fact-finding investigation conducted in the months after Bergdahl's disappearance concluded he left his outpost deliberately and of his own free will, according to an official briefed on the report.

    The Army has no definitive finding that Bergdahl deserted because that would require knowing his intent -- something officials couldn't learn without talking to the soldier, a U.S. military official has told CNN.

    Bowe Bergdahl: Strong, well-rounded and easy to talk to, friends say