Skip to main content

Witty signs keep drivers focused on tricky Alaskan road

By CNN Staff
updated 10:45 PM EDT, Sun June 8, 2014
Humorous signage along steep, winding Grande Drive in Denali, Alaska, is meant to get a laugh out of drivers. And keep them focused on the cliff-laden road. Massive mosquitoes are a (normally) not-so-funny feature of the Alaskan wilderness. Humorous signage along steep, winding Grande Drive in Denali, Alaska, is meant to get a laugh out of drivers. And keep them focused on the cliff-laden road. Massive mosquitoes are a (normally) not-so-funny feature of the Alaskan wilderness.
HIDE CAPTION
Grande Drive in Denali, Alaska
First sign something is afoot
"OK, turn left at ... ?"
Million dollar dirt road
Speed limit, or crawl limit?
Funny sign, serious message
No car-aircraft collisions yet
More than signs to look at
Wishful thinking? Maybe not
Payoff
High and mighty
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
>
>>
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Drivers ascending Grande Drive in Denali, Alaska, are kept entertained by a succession of unexpected signs
  • Sings warn of falling coconuts and killer moose. One is more likely than the other
  • The near mile-long dirt road up Sugarloaf Mountain cost about $1 million to build

(CNN) -- Although residents often like to joke that it is, the mosquito isn't actually Alaska's official state bird. (That'd be the willow ptarmigan.)

You also won't see many coconut trees growing in the far north.

Judging by signage along Grande Drive in Denali, Alaska, however, you might not necessarily know those things.

Appearing along the steep, winding ascent to the top of Sugarloaf Mountain, road signs depicting giant mosquitoes carrying off human prey and warning of falling coconuts are clearly meant to get a laugh out of drivers.

Just less than a mile long and costing about $1 million to build, the mostly dirt road (some sharp corners are paved) leads to the Grande Denali Lodge.

Construction on the road began in 2000; the hotel opened in 2002.

There are exactly zero turns to be made along remote Grande Drive.
There are exactly zero turns to be made along remote Grande Drive.

Installed in stages over the past four or five years, according to Grande Denali Lodge general manager Joe Merrill, the signs were the brainchild of Dennis Brandon, a marketing consultant for the hotel who has a long history in the hospitality industry in Alaska.

"The collection has been added to each year," says Merrill. "The ideas (for the signs) now come out of different peoples' minds."

MORE: 10 of the world's best drives

Tiny town, big mountains

More a small collection of businesses than a town, the bulk of Denali (also unofficially referred to as "The Canyon" and Glitter Gulch) is located less than two miles from the entrance to Denali National Park and Preserve.

The park is home to some of the greatest wildlife viewing opportunities in the world -- grizzly bear, moose, Dall sheep, caribou, 35 other species of mammals and 169 species of birds are often visible from the park's single road in spring, summer and fall.

The park's centerpiece is Mount McKinley (also called "Denali"), North America's highest peak at 20,237 feet (6,168 meters).

The village of Denali has only about 160 year-round residents.

Those numbers swell during the summer season when area hotels, restaurants and shops reopen with the spring thaw and start of the tourist season.

Located at the top of Grande Drive, Grande Denali Lodge is one of the area's largest hotels.

The drive to the top is less than a mile, but it seems much longer. The views make it worth the effort.
The drive to the top is less than a mile, but it seems much longer. The views make it worth the effort.

It's Alpenglow Restaurant and Lounge has an outdoor deck from which visitors can take in monster views facing southward toward the park entrance.

As for the broader purpose of the signs, Merrill suggests it's about more than just laughs.

"I guess they're also a way to take peoples' attention away from the side of the road with the cliffs," he says.

"I'm pretty sure we're not done with the signs. Stay tuned to see what our warped minds come up with next."

MORE: Alaska in winter: Amazing photos

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 9:17 AM EDT, Fri September 26, 2014
The Y-40 Deep Joy, the world's deepest swimming pool at the Hotel Millepini Terme in Montegrotto Terme, Italy.
An Italian spa complex adds new depths to the hotel swimming pool concept with a 42-meter plunge chamber.
updated 8:36 PM EDT, Wed September 24, 2014
Whether spiraling up mountains or sky-scraping attractions, these stairs give new meaning to the phrase "watch your step".
updated 10:29 AM EDT, Mon September 22, 2014
Even during the harshest periods of the communist era, being Shanghainese had a special cachet in China.
updated 8:52 AM EDT, Wed September 24, 2014
Up the Inside Passage on a heritage tugboat, sport fishermen chase British Columbia's monster salmon.
updated 3:41 AM EDT, Wed September 24, 2014
New York to London in three hours? The European aviation giant is joining the race to make it happen.
updated 6:07 AM EDT, Tue September 23, 2014
Which cities provide the most memorable party times? A self-proclaimed "nightlife connoisseur" names his top 10.
updated 11:44 PM EDT, Sun September 21, 2014
Whether you're looking for a post-meeting pint or a wild night out, creativity is on the menu at these hot Hong Kong venues.
updated 6:28 AM EDT, Tue September 23, 2014
An image showing the Istanbul district of Beyoglu where gentrification is changing the face of the neighborhood and leading the closure of many old shops and establishments.
Artists and migrants are moving out as a once-crumbling neighborhood goes upscale.
updated 1:02 AM EDT, Sat September 20, 2014
They irrigate our farms, are an important means of transport and a source of eco-friendly power.
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT