Skip to main content

Thailand's ex-PM Yingluck Shinawatra freed from custody, sources say

By Kocha Olarn, Paula Hancocks and Laura Smith-Spark CNN
updated 3:01 PM EDT, Sun May 25, 2014
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Source close to Yingluck Shinawatra confirms she was released from military camp
  • An aide to Yingluck contradicts junta source's assertion that she has freedom of movement
  • Bangkok is largely calm but more organized protests are expected Monday
  • Thailand's armed forces seized power in a coup Thursday

Bangkok, Thailand (CNN) -- Former Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra is no longer in military custody, according to a highly placed source in the junta that took over Thailand in a coup d'etat last week.

A source close to Yingluck also confirmed to CNN that she was released from a military camp.

Thai anti-coup activist Sombat Boonngamanong, center, gestures as he arrives escorted by police and soldiers at a military court in Bangkok on Thursday, June 12. The prominent anti-coup figure faces up to 14 years in prison if convicted of incitement, computer crimes and ignoring a summons by the junta, police said. The Thai military carried out a coup May 22 after months of unrest had destabilized the country's elected government and caused outbursts of deadly violence in Bangkok. Thai anti-coup activist Sombat Boonngamanong, center, gestures as he arrives escorted by police and soldiers at a military court in Bangkok on Thursday, June 12. The prominent anti-coup figure faces up to 14 years in prison if convicted of incitement, computer crimes and ignoring a summons by the junta, police said. The Thai military carried out a coup May 22 after months of unrest had destabilized the country's elected government and caused outbursts of deadly violence in Bangkok.
Military coup in Thailand
HIDE CAPTION
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
>
>>
Photos: Military coup in Thailand Photos: Military coup in Thailand
Thailand coup into its third day
Thai military tightens grip with curfew

The former prime minister was ordered to report to the military junta, the National Council for Peace and Order, on Friday. More than 100 others, including politicians and activists, have also been summoned.

The armed forces seized power in a coup Thursday after months of turmoil that paralyzed much of the government and caused deadly clashes in Bangkok.

Yingluck was freed after she reported to the Thai military, the junta source told CNN, adding that the former prime minister was asked to "help us maintain peace and order and not to get involved with protesters or any political movement."

The military source, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the situation, insisted that Yingluck has freedom of movement and communications.

A close aide to the former prime minister could not confirm when Yingluck was released, and contradicted the military's assertion that she was free to move around.

"I don't think she has freedom of mobility and communication," the source said.

Altogether, around 150 people will be required to appear before the National Council for Peace and Order, a military spokesman said Saturday.

Those summoned include academics and one of Yingluck's chief opponents, "Yellow Shirt" movement leader Sondhi Limthongkul. The politician suffered a gunshot wound to the head during unrest in 2009 but later recovered.

"We want to give them some time to relax and have time to think over the problem," the spokesman said.

The council wants to "adjust their perception and make them think about the country, think about the Thai people as a whole, not just one particular group."

Street protests

Bangkok was for the most part peaceful Sunday, although there was some jostling between protesters voicing their opposition to the coup and security forces.

More organized protests are expected in the capital on Monday.

The junta has imposed martial law, which includes a curfew, and shut out independent media reporting. CNN International's broadcasting has been blacked out in Thailand.

It also dissolved the Senate, according to a statement from the military chief read on the country's broadcast outlets.

On Saturday, a number of major TV stations were back on air, including MCOT, TPBS and NBT.

Is Thailand safe for tourists?

Thai military: Think before you tweet

CNN's Kocka Olarn and Paula Hancocks reported from Bangkok and Laura Smith-Spark wrote from London.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
Thailand coup
updated 12:37 AM EDT, Mon June 16, 2014
Thailand's new military ruler has added a personal touch to the post-coup charm offensive, writing the lyrics to a pro-junta ballad.
updated 1:03 AM EDT, Tue June 10, 2014
Pageant winner Weluree "Fai" Ditsayabut has relinquished her title under a barrage of criticism over her comments about red shirts.
updated 7:32 AM EDT, Wed June 4, 2014
They may not be led by Katniss Everdeen, but Thai protesters have adopted one of her symbols. Jessica King reports.
updated 3:29 AM EDT, Mon May 26, 2014
The general who seized control of Thailand in a coup has announced he has received royal endorsement to run the country.
updated 3:01 PM EDT, Sun May 25, 2014
Former Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra is no longer in military custody, according to a highly placed source in the junta.
updated 5:36 AM EDT, Sun May 25, 2014
Photos of the demonstrations against military rule in Thailand.
updated 4:03 PM EDT, Sat May 24, 2014
U.S. suspends $3.5 million in aid to Thailand after the military took charge of the country.
updated 8:05 AM EDT, Fri May 23, 2014
Thailand's military declared Thursday that it has taken control of the country in a coup. What does it mean? Here's our explainer.
updated 8:06 AM EDT, Fri May 23, 2014
If you're planning on visiting the country, you should be aware of what's going on.
updated 4:55 AM EDT, Fri May 23, 2014
The U.S. Ambassador to Thailand, Kristie Kenney, reacts to the Thai military coup.
updated 8:04 AM EDT, Fri May 23, 2014
The Thai military has censored TV and radio -- and social media could be next.
updated 2:02 PM EDT, Thu May 22, 2014
Many people are going about their lives as normal -- some are even responding playfully.
One iReporter living in Bangkok says he is more worried about neighborhood snakes than the military coup.
updated 5:48 PM EDT, Thu May 22, 2014
Thailand's military chief announces coup in a televised national address.
updated 12:34 PM EDT, Thu May 22, 2014
Thailand's army has declared martial law, but what does it mean for the country? Here's an explainer.
updated 6:36 PM EDT, Tue May 20, 2014
CNN's Paula Hancocks reports on the mood in Bangkok after martial law was imposed by the military.
updated 7:42 AM EDT, Tue May 20, 2014
Nina Dos Santos talks with Hana Microelectronics CEO Richard Han about the current state of Thailand's economy.
updated 3:21 AM EDT, Mon May 19, 2014
Standard and Poor's may downgrade Thailand's credit rating should the political turmoil continue much longer.
updated 3:37 PM EDT, Wed May 7, 2014
Thailand's Constitutional Court has dismissed PM Yingluck Shinawatra from office after finding her guilty of violating the country's constitution.
ADVERTISEMENT