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The 5 apology rules that Sterling broke

By Gene Grabowski
updated 7:34 AM EDT, Thu May 15, 2014
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Gene Grabowski: Did anybody counsel Donald Sterling on how to behave in interview?
  • Grabowksi: Apologize, then say how you're going to ensure it never happens again
  • He says ask forgiveness; then make a sacrifice or gesture for the people you offended
  • Grabowski: Never blame others or the media for the crisis you have created

Editor's note: Gene Grabowski is a crisis communications expert with LEVICK Communications and has 30 years' experience advising athletes, celebrities and business people about issues management. He is a former reporter for The Associated Press and The Washington Times. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the writer.

(CNN) -- It seemed as if billionaire Donald Sterling apparently didn't have enough money left after buying apartments, cars and dresses for V. Stiviano to pay for appropriate legal or communications advice before his exclusive interview with CNN's Anderson Cooper.

We don't know for sure, but that's the only conclusion one can draw from the Los Angeles Clippers owner's disastrous attempt at exoneration that aired Monday night on "AC 360."

Gene Grabowski
Gene Grabowski

Sterling broke just about every rule of crisis communications during his taped and edited interview with Cooper, starting with issuing an obviously half-hearted apology for his racially offensive remarks surreptitiously recorded by Stiviano during a private discussion.

Channeling Richard Nixon, Sterling three times declared unconvincingly "I am not a racist," when fumbling for an explanation for why he ranted in an audio recording about his disapproval of Stiviano being seen with black men at Clippers home basketball games.

"Twenty-five percent of my whole game are black people and I love them. I can't explain some of the stupid, foolish uneducated words that I uttered."

Opinion: Sterling apology was an epic fail

The interview went downhill from there, with Sterling rambling from subject to subject, with no apparent goal except to somehow look sympathetic to viewers. Obviously he failed.

Here are some of the most important rules of crisis communications he broke during his time on camera:

Spike Lee weighs in on Sterling scandal
Sterling to AC: You're more of a racist
Sterling: I'm so sorry, I'm so apologetic

1. Apologize sincerely, then move on to say what you are doing to ensure the transgression never happens again. Announce that you are entering rehabilitation, meeting with the group you have offended to make amends or taking sensitivity training. But you must demonstrate that you are taking concrete steps to correct your future behavior. Sterling apologized to his 29 fellow NBA franchise owners and to Commissioner Adam Silver, yet he neglected to say what he would do to improve.

2. Make a sacrifice. Whether you are wealthy or not, you must give something up as a gesture of your commitment to seek forgiveness from the people you have offended. If you offend the African-American community, a generous contribution of money and your personal time to an inner-city charity may be in order. If you offend a religious group, a donation to a church or charitable group is appropriate.

And the bigger the offense, the larger the gift should be. In Sterling's case, we're probably talking millions of dollars and hundreds of hours.

3. Ask forgiveness of those whom you have offended. Sterling assumed that NBA players, owners, fans and everyone in America would understand his plight and give him a pass because he is a well-intentioned 80-year-old billionaire with a big mouth. He skipped a major step when he forgot to even ask.

4. Never blame others for the crisis you have created. First, Sterling claimed Stiviano baited him into making his racially offensive comments. Then he said she wasn't really a bad person and moved on to gratuitously criticize NBA Hall of Famer, philanthropist and businessman Earvin "Magic" Johnson.

"What does he do for the black people? He doesn't do anything. He acts so holy. He made love to every girl in every city in America and he had AIDS," Sterling said. "Is he an example to children? Because he has money, he is able to treat himself. ... He should fade into the background." With these statements, Sterling created another crisis for himself and for the NBA.

5. Never blame the news media. Sterling claimed that NBA players and owners still like him and that he has received "thousands of phone calls" of support from friends and colleagues. Who then is attacking the Clippers owner for his remarks?

"It's the media that's out to get me," Sterling said. Cooper and every other journalist watching the interview or seeing the news reports afterward is now his foe, whether or not they were before he made that comment.

Appearing on CNN immediately after the jaw-dropping interview, African-American film maker Spike Lee perhaps captured it best for all communications experts when he said of Sterling: "Why do they let him speak? Who's around him?" Who indeed.

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