Skip to main content

Dominique Strauss-Kahn may sue Belgian sex club using his initials

By Dheepthika Laurent and Laura Akhoun, CNN
updated 5:48 AM EDT, Thu May 1, 2014
Dominique Strauss-Kahn doesn't want a Belgian sex club to use the initials
Dominique Strauss-Kahn doesn't want a Belgian sex club to use the initials "D.S.K."
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Strauss-Kahn was accused of sexually assaulting a hotel maid in New York in 2011
  • He was indicted on seven counts, including criminal sexual acts and sexual abuse
  • The charges were dropped, but the maid filed a civil lawsuit and settled for undisclosed amount

Paris (CNN) -- Dominique Strauss-Kahn, the former International Monetary Fund chief who was at one time accused of sexually assaulting a hotel maid in New York, is threatening to sue a Belgian sex club using the initials "D.S.K."

The Dodo Sex Klub is due to open Wednesday in Blaton, a town on the Belgian-French border.

Strauss-Kahn is often referred to as "DSK," especially by the French media.

Strauss-Kahn talks hotel incident

The former head of the IMF "will take all legal measures necessary to cease the smearing of his name," according to a statement released by five French and Belgian lawyers. Strauss-Kahn's attorney had no further comment when contacted by CNN.

The club's owner, Dominique Alderweireld, owns a string of prostitution houses in Belgium. And he's no stranger to Strauss-Kahn. Later this year, Alderweireld will be on trial, along with Strauss-Kahn, on charges of "aggravated pimping" for their alleged participation in a prostitution ring at the Hotel Carlton in Lille, in northern France.

In 2011, a maid at New York's Sofitel Hotel accused Strauss-Kahn of trying to force himself on her when she came to clean his room. He was indicted on seven counts, including sexual assault and attempted rape, but all the charges were dropped after prosecutors found inconsistencies in the woman's story.

The woman later filed a civil lawsuit against Strauss-Kahn. The two reached a settlement in 2012, but the terms were not disclosed.

READ: 2013: Exclusive: 'I don't think I have any kind of problem with women,' Strauss-Kahn says

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 9:54 PM EST, Tue December 23, 2014
A decade on from devastating 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the Red Cross' Matthias Schmale says that the lessons learned have made us safer.
updated 7:24 PM EST, Tue December 23, 2014
As soon as word broke that "The Interview" will hit some theaters, celebrations erupted across social media -- including from the stars of the film.
updated 1:44 PM EST, Tue December 23, 2014
Did a rogue hacker -- or the U.S. government -- cut the cord for the regime's Internet?
updated 8:06 PM EST, Tue December 23, 2014
Monaco's newborn royals, Princess Gabriella and Crown Prince Jacques Honore Rainier, posed for their first official photos with their parents.
updated 12:06 PM EST, Tue December 23, 2014
Tim Berners-Lee, the man credited with inventing the world wide web, gives a speech on April 18, 2012 in Lyon, central France, during the World Wide Web 2012 international conference on April 18, 2012 in Lyon.
What's next for the Internet? Acclaimed scientist Sir Tim Berners-Lee shares his insights.
updated 3:22 AM EST, Tue December 23, 2014
The United States and North Korea have long been locked in a bitter cycle of escalating and deescalating tensions. But the current cyber conflict may be especially hard to predict.
updated 4:00 PM EST, Mon December 22, 2014
A chilling video shows Boko Haram executing dozens of non-Muslims.
updated 6:34 AM EST, Mon December 22, 2014
New planes, new flight tests ... but will we get cheaper airfares?
updated 12:46 PM EST, Sun December 21, 2014
The killing of two cops could not have happened at a worse time for a city embroiled in a public battle over police-community relations, Errol Louis says.
updated 9:51 PM EST, Sun December 21, 2014
The gateway to Japan's capital, Tokyo Station, is celebrating its centennial this month -- and it has never looked better.
updated 11:21 AM EST, Sat December 20, 2014
Unicef has warned that more than 1.7 million children in conflict-torn areas of eastern Ukraine face an "extremely serious" situation.
updated 12:01 PM EST, Mon December 22, 2014
Each day, CNN brings you an image capturing a moment to remember, defining the present in our changing world.
Browse through images from CNN teams around the world that you don't always see on news reports.
ADVERTISEMENT