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A year later, Boston Marathon runners 'take back that finish line!'

By Ashley Fantz, CNN
updated 11:38 AM EDT, Tue April 22, 2014
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • American Meb Keflezighi's unofficial time is 2:08:37, race's Facebook page says
  • Kenya's Rita Jeptoo, 33, wins women's division in 2:18:57, race says via Twitter
  • Three people died in the 2013 blasts and more than 260 were wounded

(CNN) -- The first American man to win the Boston Marathon since 1983 crossed the finish line Monday, triumphant in a storied race that has become a national symbol of resiliency and determination.

Meb Keflezighi, 38, won the men's division with an official time of 2:08:37, according to the Boston Marathon's Facebook page.

The women's elite group began the 26.2-mile journey around 9:30 a.m. ET, and the elite men's group at 10. Waves of other runners started after them.

For Kenya's Rita Jeptoo, 33, it was a second consecutive victory. She again won the women's division with an unofficial -- and course record -- time of 2:18:57, according to the event's official Twitter account.

After a tragedy, preserving the love
Meb Keflezighi of the United States crosses the finish line to win the men's division of the Boston Marathon in downtown Boston on Monday, April 21. Meb Keflezighi of the United States crosses the finish line to win the men's division of the Boston Marathon in downtown Boston on Monday, April 21.
The 2014 Boston Marathon
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Photos: 2014 Boston Marathon Photos: 2014 Boston Marathon

But for most of the 36,000 runners, the race had nothing to do with competition. The 2013 race was marred by bombings near the end of the course that killed three people and wounded more than 260.

At the start Monday, as competitors stood shoulder to shoulder, the race announcer shouted to them, "Take back that finish line!"

Lee Ann Yanni told CNN before the race that she planned to run wearing a necklace with a silver stingray charm that her father gave her before he died of cancer. The force of the blasts as she ran in 2013 along Boylston Street failed to tear the memento from her body. She would not be stopped then, and she wouldn't be stopped Monday, she vowed.

Unable to walk for five and a half weeks, she eventually got back to training and finished the Chicago Marathon in October in 5 hours and 44 minutes.

"I'm running for those who can't," she told CNN. "I don't run very pretty ... but at the finish line, everybody is going to be represented."

Krystle Campbell, 29; Lu Lingzi, 23; and grade-schooler Martin Richard, 8, were killed in the 2013 bombing. Some of the wounded lost limbs.

J.P. Norden and his brother Paul recently recounted the confusion and horror of April 15, 2013, with CNN at the Forum Restaurant on Boylston Street.

"Where we are right now where we got hurt, lost ... (it) changed our lives but, I don't know. ..." J.P. said, struggling to find the words.

Each brother had his right leg amputated, and they now walk on prosthetic legs.

"It was such a tough journey and stuff," J.P. said, "but we got so much help from everyone that it's weird, it seems like so long away and ago and quick at the same time."

A year later, survivors are defiant and resilient

Another survivor, Marc Fucarile, also lost his right leg. He's undergone numerous surgeries, but shrapnel is still lodged in the inner wall of his heart. If it moves, he could die. Recently, the 35-year-old went to a court hearing for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev who allegedly, along with his brother Tamerlan Tsarnaev, were responsible for the bombing.

Tamerlan was killed in a shootout with police; Dzhokhar is facing numerous charges and could be sentenced to death. His trial is set to begin in November, and he has pleaded not guilty.

"Whatever he gets," Fucarile told CNN, "he deserves."

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev awaits trial

On Tuesday, April 15, a moment of silence was observed at the finish line on the one-year anniversary of the bombings. Church bells rang and a flag was raised as a steady rain fell. The mantra "Boston Strong" was heard loud and clear.

On race day, a tweet apparently from President Barack Obama appeared @WhiteHouse. "Congrats to @runmeb and @ShalaneFlanagan for making America proud! All of today's runners showed the world the meaning of #BostonStrong. -bo."

Massachusetts native Shalane Flanagan was leading the pack of female runners for part of the race. According to the Boston Athletic Association's web site, she finished seventh among the women with a time of 2:22:02.

This year's race has 9,000 more runners than last year's, and an unprecedented crowd was expected to gather, officials have said.

CNN affiliate WBZ in Boston showed images on its website of the race as it unfolded.

Security was expected to be very tight. Backpacks were not allowed on the course this year, said Kurt Schwartz, director of the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency.

Costumes that cover the face, containers with more than 1 liter of liquid and bulky clothes such as vests with pockets were also prohibited.

The course this year would be "very safe," Gov. Deval Patrick told CBS' "Face the Nation" on Sunday, adding, "Somebody said it may be the safest place in America."

Boston Marathon security: How can you keep 26.2 miles safe?

Fast facts about the Boston Marathon

CNN's Ray Sanchez, Holly Yan and Jason Carroll contributed to this report.

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