Skip to main content

Warrior for justice: Why fugitives would surrender to Chuck Stone

By Elmer Smith
updated 9:17 AM EDT, Mon April 14, 2014
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Elmer Smith remembers Chuck Stone, legendary Philadelphia journalist, who died April 6
  • Stone was known as a thorn in the side of police and an advocate for the little guy
  • Stone was a Tuskegee Airman and a founder of National Association of Black Journalists

Editor's note: Elmer Smith is an award-winning journalist and retired columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.

(CNN) -- A line of angry protesters waving signs and wearing scows formed a ring around the front entrance of the Daily News' headquarters.

They took turns at the bullhorn accusing the paper of everything from libel to genocide. They didn't bring a list of demands; they weren't looking to negotiate. They had one goal: to shut the paper down forever.

Elmer Smith
Elmer Smith

"We're going to march until the walls come down," one shouted.

Employees who would normally head out the revolving door to one of the lunch trucks along Broad street developed a taste for cafeteria food that day.

Not Chuck Stone.

Stone, senior editor of the newspaper they had pledged to kill, walked out the front entrance and met their scows with a broad smile. Picketers committed to the complete destruction of the Daily News returned his smile or nodded in recognition as they passed him. A few even shook his hand.

I'll never forget that scene. It was, at once, improbable yet typical of a man who was as comfortable in the salons of power as he was in the embrace of the disadvantaged.

Chuck was the last man you'd pick out of a lineup of guys suspected of aiding and abetting dangerous felons. In his horn-rimmed glasses, hand-tied, silk bowties and graying crew cut, he looked like a grown-up version of the nerds that tough guys used to beat up to burnish their reps.

But fugitives who were wanted for vicious assaults and heinous crimes would call Chuck before they called their lawyers. In a town where some cops were known to administer curbside justice, surrendering to Chuck Stone was a way to keep from having their faces rearranged on the way to jail. At least 75 fugitives did just that over Stone's 19-year career.

In Egypt, case of trial by error
Two AP journalists attacked in Kabul
U.S. journalist kicked out of Russia

In 1981, he negotiated the release of six prison guards being held hostage by a band of armed inmates whose leader was doing life for killing a cop. Prisoners guards and a remarkably composed Chuck Stone emerged unscathed from the two-day ordeal.

His departure in 1991 ended a 19-year run as the most influential columnist in town. Chuck's courtly manners and air of refinement could disarm the unwary. But the Daily News knew what they were getting when they hired him in 1972. Newsweek magazine had once dubbed him "the angry man of the negro press."

Philadelphia was a target-rich environment in 1972. Frank Rizzo, a former police commissioner who had once left a formal dinner in a tuxedo to supervise the public strip search of a group of unarmed Black Panthers, had been elected mayor. Chuck began his Daily News tenure in time to see four City Council members, including the city council president get ensnared in the Abscam net.

In a one-party town where an inbred Democratic machine reigned supreme, Chuck Stone was like a kid in a candy shop. He attacked police brutality, political corruption, the chronic failure of public schools and institutional injustice twice a week in the Daily News and weekly on his aptly-named TV show, "On Target".

He was the Daily News' first black columnist. But he never saw color when he was looking through his gun sights. He described Wilson W. Goode, the city's first black mayor, as a "paternalistic ferret." When State Rep. Dwight Evans was the most-powerful black politician in the state capital, Stone called him "an oleaginous eel."

The English language was a sharp tool in his hands. He described one of his targets as a "retromingent," a term for an animal who urinates backward. But he could be effusive in praise. He originated the George Fencl Award, an honor named for a cop known for the kind of firm but fair police work which Stone advocated.

His death on April 6 at age 89 ended a lifetime of service. He was trained as a Tuskegee Airman in a segregated U.S. Army in WWII. He had worked overseas for an international aid organization in the '50s. In the '60s, he was a special assistant to U.S. Rep. Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. and later authored three books. He ended his career as a professor of Journalism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, before retiring five years ago.

Perhaps his most lasting legacy is as a founder of the National Association of Black Journalists. Les Payne, a Pulitizer Prize-winning columnist and NABJ co-founder once described him as the first amongst equals in founding NABJ.

"There were a lot of us in the room," Payne told me. "But Chuck was the one holding the clipboard."

Follow us on Twitter @CNNOpinion.

Join us on Facebook.com/CNNOpinion.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 6:11 PM EST, Thu December 18, 2014
President Obama has been flexing his executive muscles lately despite Democrat's losses, writes Gloria Borger
updated 2:51 PM EST, Thu December 18, 2014
Jeff Yang says the film industry's surrender will have lasting implications.
updated 4:13 PM EST, Thu December 18, 2014
Newt Gingrich: No one should underestimate the historic importance of the collapse of American defenses in the Sony Pictures attack.
updated 7:55 AM EST, Wed December 10, 2014
Dean Obeidallah asks how the genuine Stephen Colbert will do, compared to "Stephen Colbert"
updated 12:34 PM EST, Thu December 18, 2014
Some GOP politicians want drug tests for welfare recipients; Eric Liu says bailed-out execs should get equal treatment
updated 8:42 AM EST, Thu December 18, 2014
Louis Perez: Obama introduced a long-absent element of lucidity into U.S. policy on Cuba.
updated 12:40 PM EST, Tue December 16, 2014
The slaughter of more than 130 children by the Pakistani Taliban may prove as pivotal to Pakistan's security policy as the 9/11 attacks were for the U.S., says Peter Bergen.
updated 11:00 AM EST, Wed December 17, 2014
The Internet is an online extension of our own neighborhoods. It's time for us to take their protection just as seriously, says Arun Vishwanath.
updated 4:54 PM EST, Tue December 16, 2014
Gayle Lemmon says we must speak out for the right of children to education -- and peace
updated 5:23 AM EST, Wed December 17, 2014
Russia's economic woes just seem to be getting worse. How will President Vladimir Putin respond? Frida Ghitis gives her take.
updated 1:39 AM EST, Wed December 17, 2014
Australia has generally seen itself as detached from the threat of terrorism. The hostage incident this week may change that, writes Max Barry.
updated 3:20 PM EST, Fri December 12, 2014
Thomas Maier says the trove of letters the Kennedy family has tried to guard from public view gives insight into the Kennedy legacy and the history of era.
updated 9:56 AM EST, Mon December 15, 2014
Will Congress reform the CIA? It's probably best not to expect much from Washington. This is not the 1970s, and the chances for substantive reform are not good.
updated 4:01 PM EST, Mon December 15, 2014
From superstorms to droughts, not a week goes by without a major disruption somewhere in the U.S. But with the right planning, natural disasters don't have to be devastating.
updated 9:53 AM EST, Mon December 15, 2014
Would you rather be sexy or smart? Carol Costello says she hates this dumb question.
updated 5:53 PM EST, Sun December 14, 2014
A story about Pope Francis allegedly saying animals can go to heaven went viral late last week. The problem is that it wasn't true. Heidi Schlumpf looks at the discussion.
updated 10:50 AM EST, Sun December 14, 2014
Democratic leaders should wake up to the reality that the party's path to electoral power runs through the streets, where part of the party's base has been marching for months, says Errol Louis
updated 4:23 PM EST, Sat December 13, 2014
David Gergen: John Brennan deserves a national salute for his efforts to put the report about the CIA in perspective
updated 9:26 AM EST, Fri December 12, 2014
Anwar Sanders says that in some ways, cops and protesters are on the same side
updated 9:39 AM EST, Thu December 11, 2014
A view by Samir Naji, a Yemeni who was accused of serving in Osama bin Laden's security detail and imprisoned for nearly 13 years without charge in Guantanamo Bay
updated 12:38 PM EST, Sun December 14, 2014
S.E. Cupp asks: How much reality do you really want in your escapist TV fare?
updated 1:28 PM EST, Thu December 11, 2014
Rip Rapson says the city's 'Grand Bargain' saved pensions and a world class art collection by pulling varied stakeholders together, setting civic priorities and thinking outside the box
updated 6:10 PM EST, Sat December 13, 2014
Glenn Schwartz says the airing of the company's embarrassing emails might wake us up to the usefulness of talking in-person instead of electronically
updated 5:33 PM EST, Fri December 12, 2014
The computer glitch that disrupted air traffic over the U.K. on Friday was a nuisance, but not dangerous, says Les Abend
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT