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Kenya double in London Marathon as Mo Farah disappoints on debut

Wilson Kipsang crosses the line in triumph at the 34th London Marathon in a new course record time.

Story highlights

  • Kenya's Wilson Kipsang wins London Marathon
  • Compatriot Stanley Biwott finishes second
  • Home hope Mo Farah trails home in eighth spot
  • Edna Kiplagat wins women's race for Kenya
World record-holder Wilson Kipsang completed a Kenyan double at the London Marathon Sunday as home hope Mo Farah disappointed on his debut over the 42km distance.
Kipsang broke the course record with a time of two hours four minutes and 27 seconds, moving clear of second-placed compatriot Stanley Biwott in the closing stages of the race in the British capital.
Tsegaye Kebede, last year's winner, took third, just ahead of fellow Ethiopian Ayele Abshero.
Behind them, Farah, the reigning Olympic and world 5,000 and 10,000 meters champion, finished in eighth place with a time of two hours eight minutes and 21 seconds.
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Cheered to the echo by hundreds of thousands of fans who had gathered around the course, Farah was never a serious factor in the race after choosing to sit off the ferocious early pace set by the leaders.
The 31-year-old admitted he had made a misjudgment due to inexperience at the distance. "I wish I had gone with the front group. I had no-one to pace me because the pacemaker was slightly ahead," he told BBC Sport.
Farah, who is toying with the idea of moving up to the marathon for the 2016 Olympics in Rio, vowed to be back.
"I'm not going to finish it like this. I gave it my all but I'm disappointed I didn't go out there and give what the crowd deserve," he added.
In the women's race, another track superstar, Tirunesh Dibaba of Ethiopia, also found the step up to the marathon testing as she finished third behind Kenyan pair Edna Kiplagat and Florence Kiplagat.
Dibaba lost ground to them after dropping a water bottle at a drinks station and was never able to get on terms.
Two-time world champion Edna Kiplagat sprinted clear at the finish to win in two hours 20 minutes and 21 seconds with Dibaba coming home 14 seconds down after her mishap.
Over 30,000 runners, many raising money for charity, were taking part in the 34th running of the iconic event, which finishes on The Mall in front of Buckingham Palace.