Pyongyang slams South Korean President over nuclear remarks

South Korean President Park Geun-hye speaks during a recent meeting with her U.S. and Japanese counterparts in The Hague.

Story highlights

  • North Korea accuses South Korea's president of slander
  • President Park voices concerns over North Korea's nuclear program
  • Pyongyang launches two mid-range missiles
  • U.N. condemns the move, will consider 'appropriate response'

North Korea has launched a vitriolic attack on South Korea's President Park Geun-hye over comments she made about the country's nuclear program, accusing her of "blabbering" like a "peasant woman."

At a nuclear security summit in The Hague Monday, Park warned that North Korea's nuclear devices could end up in the hands of terrorists, and said that a nuclear meltdown at the country's main nuclear complex in Yongbyon would be more devastating than Chernobyl.

In response, a North Korean official said that if the president is serious about improving cross-border ties, she should "have discretion" and "refrain from making reckless remarks."

The spokesman for North Korea's Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of Korea accused Park of violating a pact reached at a rare high-level meeting last month, that pledged to end "slander" between the two sides.

The official accused the president of being a "faithful servant and stooge" of the United States, in an English version of the statement published on the website of North Korea's state-run KCNA news agency Thursday. Although that statement did not contain much of the colorful language reportedly used in an earlier version of the statement.

"Even if someone else wrote the dumb speech for her to read from, she should at least know what and what not to say," AFP reported the official as saying Thursday.

"She should realize she is no longer a peasant woman blabbering to herself in the corner of her room but the occupant of the (presidential office)," the statement said.

    South Korea's government said the comments were "deeply regrettable and lacking in the most basic etiquette."

    The war of words came after North Korea launched two ballistic missiles into the sea off its east coast Wednesday, violating United Nations resolutions that prohibits Pyongyang from conducting such tests.

    The U.N. Security Council condemned the move Thursday and is considering an "appropriate response," the council's president U.N. Ambassador Sylvie Lucas told reporters.

    South Korea's defense ministry believes the North Korean missile tests were in reaction to the sideline meeting between President Park, U.S. President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the The Hague's Nuclear Security Summit Monday, as well as ongoing joint U.S.-South Korean drills around the Korean peninsula.

    It's not the first time North Korea has resorting to name-calling against its southern neighbors. A previous attack on Park described the president and her government as "made up of ignorant hooligans hell-bent on hurting the dignity of the supreme leadership of (North Korea) and on eclipsing the bright sunlight."

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