Matt Every rallies to win Arnold Palmer Invitational as Adam Scott falters

Matt Every shakes hands with Arnold Palmer after winning the Arnold Palmer Invitational on Sunday.

Story highlights

  • Matt Every wins his first PGA title after rallying at the Arnold Palmer Invitational
  • Every trailed by four shots heading into Sunday but passed Adam Scott
  • Scott slipped to third at Bay Hill and finishes two shots behind the U.S.'s Every
  • Scott misses a chance to overtake Tiger Woods as golf's world No. 1

Even though he was ill, Adam Scott could do little wrong in the early rounds at the Arnold Palmer Invitational.

He led by seven shots at the halfway mark at Bay Hill in Orlando and, despite his advantage being cut entering the final round, still held a comfortable three-shot advantage as play began Sunday.

Unfortunately for the Aussie, he faltered and thus missed a chance to overtake the injured Tiger Woods as the world No. 1. Matt Every of the U.S. was the unlikely winner, compiling a strong round to claim his first PGA title.

Scott shot a four-over 76, hitting five bogeys, to slip to third, two shots behind Every's total of 275.

It wasn't the tournament he wanted ahead of the defense of his Masters crown next month.

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"I didn't putt well at all today," Scott told the Golf Channel.

"If nothing else it's a good reminder on how much putting practice I need to do before going to the Masters and just how important it is.

"If I think back to last year, I made every putt that you expect to in that last round and ultimately that's what gave me the chance to win."

Every, who trailed Scott by four shots overnight, made up ground thanks to five birdies. But two bogeys on the last three holes gave Keegan Bradley an opportunity to force a playoff.

Bradley, however, missed a birdie putt at the 18th that would have forced the playoff.

Every's drought was over.

"It's really cool," Every, who turned pro in 2006, told reporters. "I have had a lot of looks (at wins) and I kept telling myself maybe it's going to come somewhere special. I still can't believe I won.

"It's hard, it's tough man. You just never know if it's going to happen."