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Purported transcript: plane's final minutes of communication normal

By Tom Cohen, CNN
updated 6:30 PM EDT, Fri March 21, 2014
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • NEW: Document: final contact with missing plane preceded shift to Vietnam air control
  • Britain's The Telegraph publishes an alleged transcript from Flight MH370
  • CNN is unable to confirm if the purported transcript is authentic
  • It reveals nothing unusual occurring in the plane's final communications

(CNN) -- No struggle. No panic. No clues.

A purported transcript of the final 54 minutes of communication with Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 reveals nothing to suggest a problem -- either mechanical or man-made.

Britain's The Telegraph obtained what it reported to be the transcript of exchanges between copilot Fariq Abdul Hamid and air traffic controllers from before the flight took off until the final transmission.

"MH370, please contact Ho Chi Minh City 120.9, good night," is the last message from Kuala Lumpur air traffic control to the flight, according to a translated page of the document posted online by The Telegraph.

"All right, good night," was the response at 1:19 a.m. local time. That was the last communication before the plane's transponder stopped working.

CNN was unable to immediately verify the authenticity of the transcript. The Telegraph reported that the Malaysian government declined to release it.

No sign of airliner after day 2 of search in southern Indian Ocean

A policewoman watches a couple whose son was on board the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 cry outside the airline's office building in Beijing after officials refused to meet with them on Wednesday, June 11. The jet has been missing since March 8. A policewoman watches a couple whose son was on board the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 cry outside the airline's office building in Beijing after officials refused to meet with them on Wednesday, June 11. The jet has been missing since March 8.
The search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370
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According to The Telegraph's report, nothing in the purported transcript suggests that anything unusual or untoward occurred before communications with the Boeing 777 ended.

It said Hamid signed in at 12:36 a.m. on the flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. At 1:07 a.m., Hamid says the plane was flying at a cruising altitude of 35,000 feet, which repeated information provided six minutes earlier, The Telegraph reported.

A former British Airways pilot who flew the same kind of aircraft found nothing suspicious about that exchange.

"It could be as simple as the pilot forgetting or not being sure that he had told air traffic controllers he had reached the altitude," the former pilot, Steve Landells, told The Telegraph. "He might be reconfirming he was at 350 (35,000 feet). It is not unusual. I wouldn't read anything into it."

Nothing unusual appears in the purported transcript around the plane's final transmission, which came two minutes before the transponder halted, The Telegraph reported.

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