Part of complete coverage on

A rare snoop inside homes of some of the world's greatest living architects

From April 8 until April 13, visitors to the <a href='http://www.cosmit.it/en/salone_internazionale_del_mobile' target='_blank'>Salone del Mobile</a> can step into the homes of eight architects including Zaha Hadid and Shigeru Ban. As part of the exhibition <a href='http://www.cosmit.it/tool/home.php?l=en&amp;s=0,2,67,73,1623,1629' target='_blank'>"Where Architects Live,"</a> curator <a href='http://www.museweb.it/' target='_blank'>Francesca Molteni</a> visited the luminaries to see whether their private residences reflect their very public designs and reputations. "Home is something more than walls and furniture," she says. "It's related to our vales. Living in a space is different from just sitting in a room."<!-- -->
</br><!-- -->
</br><i><a href='http://www.shigerubanarchitects.com/' target='_blank'>Shigeru Ban</a></i><i>, Tokyo</i><!-- -->
</br><!-- -->
</br>In 1997 Japanese architect Shigeru Ban designed this apartment building in a tranquil wooded area of Tokyo. "The fantastic thing is that he did not cut down a single tree to build the house," Molteni says. "He had to cleverly build around them."

From April 8 until April 13, visitors to the Salone del Mobile can step into the homes of eight architects including Zaha Hadid and Shigeru Ban. As part of the exhibition "Where Architects Live," curator Francesca Molteni visited the luminaries to see whether their private residences reflect their very public designs and reputations. "Home is something more than walls and furniture," she says. "It's related to our vales. Living in a space is different from just sitting in a room."

Shigeru Ban, Tokyo

In 1997 Japanese architect Shigeru Ban designed this apartment building in a tranquil wooded area of Tokyo. "The fantastic thing is that he did not cut down a single tree to build the house," Molteni says. "He had to cleverly build around them."