Skip to main content

Pakistan cuts sentence of doctor who helped CIA find bin Laden

By Zahir Shah Sherazi, For CNN
updated 11:12 AM EDT, Sat March 15, 2014
This photograph taken on July 22, 2010, shows Pakistani surgeon Shakeel Afridi, who was working for CIA to help find Osama bin Laden, attending a Malaria control campaign in Khyber tribal district. Pakistan's problematic relationship with the United States sailed into fresh controversy as US lawmakers warned of aid cuts after the jailing of a surgeon who helped the CIA hunt down Osama bin Laden. Shakeeel Afridi was found guilty of treason, sentenced to 33 years in prison and fined 320,000 rupees (3,500 USD) under an archaic tribal justice system that has governed Pakistan's semi-autonomous tribal belt since British rule. AFP PHOTO / MOHAMMAD RAUF (Photo credit should read MOHAMMAD RAUF/AFP/GettyImages)
This photograph taken on July 22, 2010, shows Pakistani surgeon Shakeel Afridi, who was working for CIA to help find Osama bin Laden, attending a Malaria control campaign in Khyber tribal district. Pakistan's problematic relationship with the United States sailed into fresh controversy as US lawmakers warned of aid cuts after the jailing of a surgeon who helped the CIA hunt down Osama bin Laden. Shakeeel Afridi was found guilty of treason, sentenced to 33 years in prison and fined 320,000 rupees (3,500 USD) under an archaic tribal justice system that has governed Pakistan's semi-autonomous tribal belt since British rule. AFP PHOTO / MOHAMMAD RAUF (Photo credit should read MOHAMMAD RAUF/AFP/GettyImages)
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • NEW: Phony vaccination campaign has led to a campaign against polio workers
  • The doctor was convicted of treason in May
  • His fine has also been reduced from $3,500 to $1,000

(CNN) -- A Pakistani doctor convicted of helping the CIA track Osama bin Laden had his sentence reduced Saturday by 10 years to a total of 23 years.

Last May, Dr. Shakeel Afridi had been convicted of treason and sentenced to 33 years. He was handed the sentence, together with a $3,500 fine, for spying for the United States.

The time he spent in jail prior to his conviction is not included in the decreased sentence, which is now slated to end on May 23, 2035.

Polio aid workers killed in Pakistan

In addition to getting his sentence reduced, his fine was lowered to $1,000.

Munir Azam, the commissioner of the frontier crimes regulation, announced the changes in the northwestern city of Peshawar.

The doctor helped the CIA set up a phony vaccination campaign in an attempt to collect DNA samples from relatives of the al Qaeda leader in order to verify his presence in a compound in Abbottabad.

Bin Laden was killed in the subsequent U.S. raid on the compound in May 2011.

Since then, anti-polio campaigns have been targeted by militants in Pakistan. At least 22 polio workers have been killed since July 2012.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT