Tunisia lifts state of emergency

Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki addresses the parliament at the national assembly in Tunis on February 7, 2014.

Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki lifted his country's state of emergency, according to a statement issued Thursday on Facebook.

The state of emergency has been in effect since the 2011 revolution in Tunisia, the cradle of the Arab Spring -- the grass-roots movement that toppled autocratic leaders and promoted freedom and democracy across the Arabic-speaking region in North Africa and the Middle East.

The order went into effect Wednesday, and the announcement was made Thursday on the president's official Facebook page The government in November extended the state of emergency to June, but Marzouki ended it earlier.

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"It should be noted that lifting the state of emergency does not limit the ability of the various security agencies of law enforcement from seeking the assistance of military forces when appropriate ... including the related areas of military operations and along the border areas," the decree said.

There has been political turmoil and violence in Tunisia after the January 2011 ouster of former leader Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali, instability that threatened to disrupt a democratic transition in a country once seen as a model of post-revolutionary stability in a still volatile region.

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