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Virgin tests Google Glass at check-in

By Simon Busch, CNN
updated 11:56 AM EST, Wed February 12, 2014
"Don't tell me -- that'll be a window seat?"
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Virgin Atlantic is testing Google's wearable technology at Heathrow Airport
  • Glasses identify passengers, provide flight updates and start check-in
  • Device provides information on weather and events at destination

(CNN) -- If you're accosted at an airport by someone who already knows your name, destination and dietary requirements, don't assume they're working for the TSA.

Virgin Atlantic has begun testing Google Glass.

The airline is conducting a six-week experiment with the wearable technology for passengers in its Upper Class Lounge at London Heathrow airport.

The web-connected specs should enable concierge staff to identify passengers arriving at the airport.

With data flashing before their eyes, staff can update customers on their latest flight information, as well as weather and events at their destination.

Once a passenger has been identified, the glasses promise to begin the check-in process automatically and perform services such as translating relevant foreign language travel notices.

Would you want Google Glass in class?

Glasses on the other face

Virgin is claiming a first for a trial of Google Glass in the airline industry.

But others have predicted uses for the technology by passengers, rather than airline employees.

The glasses could provide passengers with virtual, real-time maps of airports, for example -- no more hunting for a restroom.

NYPD ogles Google Glass specs

Taxi fare estimates and basic language prompts could appear before your retina on arrival at your destination.

Once on location, the technology could provide a relatively effortless way of negotiating a museum, as well as feeding users snippets on the works of art.

There might also be less of that helpless menu-stabbing.

The glasses should at least enable you to tell whether you're pointing at meat or fish.

Although you'll still have to order it.

MORE: Airbus Beluga: Inside the world's strangest-looking airplane

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