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Bus blast kills 2 soldiers in Yemeni capital

By Hakim Almasmari and Laura Smith-Spark, CNN
updated 9:30 AM EST, Tue February 4, 2014
Yemeni security forces and civilians gather at the site of an attack targeting a military bus in Sanaa on February 4, 2014.
Yemeni security forces and civilians gather at the site of an attack targeting a military bus in Sanaa on February 4, 2014.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Two soldiers are killed and 14 injured when a bomb explodes under a military bus
  • No one immediately claims responsibility for the attack in the Yemeni capital, Sanaa
  • Two blasts shook Sanaa at the weekend; two Westerners are also reported kidnapped

Sanaa, Yemen (CNN) -- Two soldiers were killed and 14 others were injured Tuesday when a bomb planted under a military bus exploded in the Yemeni capital, Sanaa, authorities said.

The soldiers were on their way to work from another district of the capital.

Three of the injured are in critical condition, authorities said.

No one immediately claimed responsibility for the attack.

Violence continues on a daily basis in Sanaa, with thousands of troops still stationed on the streets.

"Security has deteriorated over the last two months, and people are worried. Troops are in the streets, but in the wrong place in the wrong time," said Ahmed Bahri, a senior official in the opposition Haq Party.

Al Qaeda apologizes for deadly attack
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Yemen is home to al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, believed by many analysts to be the most dangerous affiliate of the terror network.

Al Qaeda has stood behind a string of attacks on government troops but denied responsibility for a bus explosion that killed five soldiers last year.

Tuesday's bus blast is the latest incident to rock the Yemeni capital in less than a week.

On Sunday, two powerful explosions shook Sanaa, with one blast near the French embassy and the other near the Defense Ministry. Nearby houses were damaged and four civilians were injured.

The Supreme Security Committee said Monday that the explosions were caused by rockets launched from rural areas surrounding the capital.

Two Westerners, a German and a Briton, have been kidnapped in Sanaa in the past three days. The government says it has no information on their whereabouts. Neither embassy concerned has commented on the kidnapping incidents.

The German was studying Arabic at a language center in the old city of Sanaa, while the Briton worked in the development sector in Yemen, Interior and Foreign Ministry officials said.

Yemen has witnessed unrest since early 2011, when mass protests first broke out. Former President Ali Abdullah Saleh was forced out of power a year later, after 33 years in office.

READ: German national kidnapped in Yemen

READ: Rebels overrun tribal stronghold in Yemen

READ: Rebels, tribesmen battle for control of key Yemeni region

Journalist Hakim Almasmari reported from Sanaa; CNN's Laura Smith-Spark wrote from London.

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