Qatar set deadline by FIFA over conditions for migrant workers

Story highlights

  • Qatar given deadline over conditions for migrant workers on 2022 World Cup
  • FIFA want detailed report by February 12
  • Amnesty International report last year highlighted the situation
  • FIFA president Sepp Blatter said at time it was "unacceptable"

Organizers of the 2022 World Cup in Qatar have been set a tight deadline by FIFA to explain how conditions are improving for migrant workers on the various building projects associated with the hosting of football's showpiece competition.

The world governing body are demanding a "detailed report" by February 12 with "information on specific steps" being taken to improve the situation.

FIFA secretary-general Jerome Valcke wrote to Qatar's Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy Thursday to request the assurances.

Concerns over the welfare of migrant workers in Qatar was highlighted by an Amnesty International report last year, which reported on widespread abuse.

Read: Amnesty report condemns treatment of migrant workers

It prompted FIFA president Sepp Blatter to describe the conditions as "unacceptable" and he raised the issue with the Emir of Qatar on a visit to Doha last November.

Are Qatar 2022 migrant workers abused?

    Just Watched

    Are Qatar 2022 migrant workers abused?

Are Qatar 2022 migrant workers abused? 02:12
PLAY VIDEO
The impact of changing World Cup dates

    Just Watched

    The impact of changing World Cup dates

The impact of changing World Cup dates 04:22
PLAY VIDEO
Qatar heat likely problem for World Cup

    Just Watched

    Qatar heat likely problem for World Cup

Qatar heat likely problem for World Cup 03:49
PLAY VIDEO
Belounis backs Qatar as World Cup hosts

    Just Watched

    Belounis backs Qatar as World Cup hosts

Belounis backs Qatar as World Cup hosts 03:02
PLAY VIDEO

FIFA executive committee member Theo Zwanziger has been given the responsibility to monitor any progress and has held a series of meeting with human rights and labor organizations, including Amnesty and the International Labor Organization (ILO).

"We are currently in the middle of an intensive process, which is exclusively aimed at improving the situation of workers in Qatar," Zwanziger said in a statement released by FIFA.

"Ultimately, what we need are clear rules and steps that will build trust and ensure that the situation, which is unacceptable at the moment, improves in a sustainable manner."

The Qatar World Cup 2022 Committee was not immediately available for comment.

Zwanziger is due before the European Parliament on February 13, the day after the deadline for Qatar to report, in a hearing over workers' rights in the Arab emirate.

Read: Blatter: Working conditions in Qatar 'unacceptable'

The executive committee will also receive an update at its March 20 and 21 meeting.

"FIFA firmly believes in the power of the World Cup in triggering positive social change in Qatar, including improving the labor rights and conditions of migrant workers," it added.

Since Qatar was awarded the 2022 World Cup it has been dogged by various controversies, with FIFA still to decide on an actual date for the competition.

Acute summer temperatures in Qatar have led to fears over safety for players and spectators and Valcke told a French radio station earlier this month that he favored a winter World Cup with a November start.

FIFA's official position is that a final decision will be made in December 2014.

Read: Top FIFA official envisions winter 2022 World Cup

      Football Focus

    • After 20 years, more than 300 goals and a host of major honors, Thierry Henry has called time on his glittering football career.
    • He might be struggling to score goals for Liverpool, but Mario Balotelli's cheeky tweet about the British monarch hit the spot during the World Cup.
    • bpr south african soccor senzo meyiwa death _00000402.jpg

      Football world mourns South African captain Senzo Meyiwa who was shot and killed during a botched robbery in a township near Johannesburg.
    • German alleged jihadist Kreshnik B (R) listens to his lawyer Mutlu Guenal (L) as he arrives at the higher regional court in Frankfurt. His face is pixelated for legal reasons.

      Once part of Germany's largest Jewish sports club, now he's the first ISIS suspect to stand trial in a country left shocked by his alleged radicalization.
    • One goal in eight matches for new club Liverpool, and dumped by the Italian national team -- Mario Balotelli has yet to shine on his English return.
    • Ched Evans smiles during the Wales training session ahead of their UEFA EURO 2012 qualifier against England on March 25, 2011 in Cardiff, Wales.

      Should a convicted rapist, who has served their time in prison, be allowed to resume their old job? What if that job was as a high-profile football player?
    • Norwegian 15-year-old Martin Odegaard is the youngest player ever to feature in a European Championships qualifying match.