Bowe Bergdahl Fast Facts

Bowe Bergdahl, the U.S. Army Sergeant released by the Taliban
Bowe Bergdahl, the U.S. Army Sergeant released by the Taliban

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    Bowe Bergdahl, the U.S. Army Sergeant released by the Taliban

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Bowe Bergdahl, the U.S. Army Sergeant released by the Taliban 06:16

(CNN)Here are some facts about Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, a former American prisoner of war.

Personal:
Birth date:
March 28, 1986
Birth place: Sun Valley, Idaho
    Birth name: Bowe Robert Bergdahl
    Father: Robert Bergdahl
    Mother: Jani Bergdahl
    Military: U.S. Army, 2008-present
    Other Facts:
    Traveled in Europe before enlisting in the Army.
    Worked as a crew member on a sailboat that traveled along the East Coast and to the Caribbean.
    It is believed he was being held by the Taliban and al Qaeda-aligned Haqqani network in Pakistan.
    Timeline:
    2008 -
    Enlists in the Army.
    May 2009 - Is deployed to Afghanistan.
    July 2, 2009 - A U.S. military official says that the soldier is being held by the clan of warlord Siraj Haqqani. The Taliban previously claimed to have captured the soldier.
    June 12, 2010 - Bergdahl is promoted to specialist.
    December 7, 2010 - His captors release a nearly 45-minute video of a thin Westerner identified as Spc. Bowe Bergdahl.
    February 2011 - Another video of Bergdahl is released.
    May 6, 2011 - Robert Bergdahl, Bowe's father, makes his first statement since the disappearance of his son. He releases a YouTube video asking for his son's release.
    June 12, 2011 - Bergdahl is promoted to sergeant.
    May 2012 - The U.S. government acknowledges that it has engaged in talks with the Taliban to free Bergdahl.
    June 6, 2013 - Bergdahl's family announces that "through the International Committee of the Red Cross, we recently received a letter we're confident was written to us by our son."
    January 2014 - A U.S. military official tells CNN that the military has obtained a new video of Bergdahl.
    February 18, 2014 - A U.S. official tells CNN discussions are under way with intermediaries overseas to see if there is any ability to gain Bergdahl's release. The discussions are being led by U.S. diplomats and involve the Defense Department.
    May 31, 2014 - President Barack Obama announces the release of Bowe Bergdahl. In exchange, five detainees at Guantanamo Bay will be released to Qatar.
    June 13, 2014 - Bergdahl returns to the United States.
    June 16, 2014 - The U.S. Army announces that a two-star general will investigate the circumstances surrounding Bergdahl's decision to leave his post in Afghanistan in 2009.
    July 14, 2014 - The Army announces that Bergdahl has completed medical care and mental counseling at an Army hospital in San Antonio and will return to active duty with a desk job.
    July 16, 2014 - Bergdahl retains attorney Eugene Fidell.
    March 3, 2015 - The U.S. military charges Bergdahl with one count each of desertion with intent to shirk important or hazardous duty, and misbehavior before the enemy by endangering the safety of a command, unit or place.
    March 25, 2015 - Bergdahl's attorney, Eugene Fidell, releases a statement outlining his defense of the soldier and containing a two-page letter from Bergdahl describing the torture he endured, which included months spent chained to a bed and further years spent chained on all fours or locked in a cage.
    September 18, 2015 - Maj. Gen. Kenneth Dahl, the Army general who led the investigation into Bergdahl's actions in Afghanistan, testifies at a preliminary hearing that jail time would be "inappropriate" for Bergdahl. Dahl says he interviewed Bergdahl for a day and a half and "did not find any evidence to corroborate the reporting that Bergdahl was...sympathetic to the Taliban," but rather, Bergdahl wanted to call attention to what he considered poor leadership of his unit.
    December 10, 2015 - The second season of the popular podcast, "Serial," premieres, featuring Bergdahl's story, where he speaks for the first time about the nearly five years he spent as a captive of the Taliban.
    December 14, 2015 - Gen. Robert Abrams, the commander of U.S. Army Forces Command, orders Bergdahl's case to a general court-martial, breaking with the U.S. military officer overseeing Bergdahl's preliminary hearing who recommended that Bergdahl be referred to a special court-martial and face no jail time.
    February 9, 2016 - A judge in the court proceedings involving Bergdahl issues a stay of proceedings, essentially putting the court-martial on hold. The stay is in place until an appeals court can resolve a dispute involving the sharing of classified evidence with Bergdahl's defense team.
    March 17, 2016 - According to an Army Sanity Board evaluation, Bergdahl had schizotypal personality disorder "at the time of the alleged criminal conduct" and now also has post-traumatic stress disorder. That information is included in the hundreds of pages of documents that Bergdahl's defense team releases on a website called the Bergdahl Docket.
    April 28, 2016 - The U.S. Army Court of Criminal Appeals denies an appeal by the prosecution, thereby granting Bergdahl's defense team access to hundreds of thousands of pages of classified information. The court also lifts the stay of proceedings issued in early February, thus allowing Bergdahl's court-martial to proceed.
    May 24, 2016 - The Army announces it posted online more than 40 documents associated with Bergdahl's ongoing military-legal case. They outline ongoing legal actions by trial counsel, defense counsel and the U.S. Army Trial Judiciary at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.