Egypt violence: Bomb explodes near military offices in Nile Delta

Deadly violence previews key Egypt vote

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    Deadly violence previews key Egypt vote

Deadly violence previews key Egypt vote 01:03

Story highlights

  • Sunday's explosion wounds four people, state-run media says
  • On Saturday, officials said student protesters set fire to a cafeteria at a university
  • Those protesters were backers of the Muslim Brotherhood
  • One student protester was killed Saturday, according to the Muslim Brotherhood

Fresh violence rocked Egypt on Sunday when an explosion wounded four people near military intelligence offices in the Nile Delta, state-run Nile TV reported.

No one has claimed responsibility for the attack.

The chaos came a day after Egyptian student protesters who support the Muslim Brotherhood were accused of torching the cafeteria of a Cairo university, state media reported.

The protesting students allegedly stormed the colleges of trade, engineering and science at Azhar University and set fire to its cafeteria, according to the official MENA news agency.

Authorities arrested 60 students, the Ministry of the Interior told state-run Nile TV. The protesters were armed with Molotov cocktails and other weapons, the ministry said.

3 killed as police, Brotherhood clash

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    3 killed as police, Brotherhood clash

3 killed as police, Brotherhood clash 02:56
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One student was killed in the violence, the Muslim Brotherhood said in a statement.

The Brotherhood said security forces, "in an attempt to silence any voice of opposition," fired tear gas, live bullets and birdshot at the protesting students.

Students at the university have been on strike following the killings of students and professors by security forces, the Muslim Brotherhood said.

The clash at the university was the latest in a string of incidents between security forces and backers of the Muslim Brotherhood.

The Egyptian government last week declared the Brotherhood a terrorist organization.

The government has threatened to arrest anyone who attends Muslim Brotherhood protests or provides financial support to the organization, an Islamist group which helped propel ousted President Mohamed Morsy to power.

Morsy, the nation's first democratically elected president, was forced out of office in July by the nation's military and arrested following widespread protests and petitions calling for his removal.

Opponents said he was a tyrant trying to impose conservative values. Supporters called his removal a coup and a blow to the democratic movement that toppled former Egyptian strongman Hosni Mubarak in 2011.

In clashes in Cairo on Friday, at least three people died and 265 were arrested.

READ: Egypt brands Brotherhood 'terrorist group'