Skip to main content

Would-be assassin John Hinckley gets longer visits at mother's home

By Bill Mears, CNN
updated 6:25 PM EST, Fri December 20, 2013
Before he shot President Reagan in 1981, John Hinckley Jr. became obsessed with actress Jodie Foster after seeing her film "Taxi Driver" at least 15 times. Defense psychiatrists said Hinckley played Russian roulette and took this photo of himself. Before he shot President Reagan in 1981, John Hinckley Jr. became obsessed with actress Jodie Foster after seeing her film "Taxi Driver" at least 15 times. Defense psychiatrists said Hinckley played Russian roulette and took this photo of himself.
HIDE CAPTION
John Hinckley Jr. and Jodie Foster
'Queen Jodie Approximately'
Hinckley's postcard to Foster
'Remain a virgin'
Kidnapping note
'I'll rescue you very soon'
'You must admit I am different'
The 'Dear Jodie' letter
Foster reacts to the failed assassination
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
>
>>
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Hinckley attempted to kill President Ronald Reagan in 1981
  • He and others were shot outside hotel in Washington
  • Hinckley is confined to a Washington psychiatric hospital
  • He is allowed limited visits to his mother's home in Virginia

(CNN) -- A federal judge will allow John Hinckley, the man who shot and severely wounded President Ronald Reagan in a 1981 assassination attempt, more time away from a Washington psychiatric hospital to visit his elderly mother in Virginia.

HIs periodic visits away from St. Elizabeth's Hospital are currently restricted to 10 days at a time. He now will be permitted 17-day visits to Williamsburg.

Hinckley was found not guilty by reason of insanity in the shootings of Reagan, White House press secretary James Brady, Secret Service agent Timothy McCarthy, and police officer Thomas Delahanty.

All survived the attack, but Brady was left permanently disabled.

Hinckley's caregivers hope he will one day get a part-time job with pay as part of a self-sufficiency strategy that will also involve expanding his ties with the Williamsburg community.

His time away from the hospital has been increased gradually over the years.

In addition, he has received art and music therapy and has had a volunteer job at another hospital, a lawyer for Hinckley said at a hearing in January that assessed a request for expanded visitation.

St. Elizabeth's is required to regularly send reports to the court, outlining Hinckley's movements and activities when he is in Williamsburg.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT