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Bayern's 'final objective' draws into sight

updated 3:24 AM EST, Wed December 18, 2013
Franck Ribery scores Bayern Munich's opening goal in their clash with Chinese side Guangzhou Evergrande.
Franck Ribery scores Bayern Munich's opening goal in their clash with Chinese side Guangzhou Evergrande.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Bayern Munich beat Guangzhou Evergrande 3-0 at the FIFA Club World Cup
  • European champions score three goals in seven minutes against Asian counterparts
  • Bayern going for a fifth trophy in 2013 and will contest the final on Sunday in Morocco
  • Pep Guardiola's side will now face either Raja Casablanca or Atletico Mineiro

(CNN) -- Bayern Munich goalkeeper Manuel Neuer called it the team's final objective, now the all-conquering German side are within touching distance of their fifth trophy of a remarkable year.

With the European Champions League, German Bundesliga, German Cup and European Super Cup titles all secured they now have their sights on the FIFA Club World Cup.

The tournament, hosted this year by Morocco, pits the champions of each continent against each other to see who can lay claim to being billed as the best club side in the world.

And a comfortable 3-0 victory over Chinese team Guangzhou Evergrande in their semifinal on Tuesday means only Moroccan champions Raja Casablanca, or Brazil's Atletico Mineiro, can derail the Bayern juggernaut.

Read: Big night for Chinese football

Bayern's three goals came in the space of seven minutes. They also hit the woodwork five times during the match.

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Guangzhou are coached by veteran Italian Marcello Lippi, who led his country to the World Cup in 2006, and became the first Chinese side to win the Asian Champions League title this year.

It meant Lippi, who won Italy's Serie A five times as a coach, became the first person to win both the European and Asian Champions League titles.

But though his side battled hard in the early stages of their glamor tie against Bayern, led by former Barcelona coach Pep Guardiola, they couldn't stem the tide for long.

Guardiola, who won 14 trophies in four years at Barca, has continued where his predecessor Jupp Heynckes left off, and once won all six competitions the Catalan giants contested in a single season.

It was Franck Ribery who got Bayern off and running, capitalizing on a poor clearance to drive the ball home with 40 minutes gone.

The Frenchman is in the running to be crowned the world's best player, nominated for the Ballon d'Or alongside Real Madrid's Cristiano Ronaldo and Barcelona's Lionel Messi, and he finished clinically.

Just four minutes later Spanish midfielder Thiago Alcantara pinched the ball and crossed for Croatian striker Mario Mandzukic to head home.

And three minutes after the break, just as Guangzhou looked to get a foothold in the match, Germany international Mario Götze's deflected shot put the result beyond doubt.

Bayern will learn who they will face in Sunday's final when Raja Casablanca take on Atletico Mineiro on Wednesday.

Read: Bayern face Arsenal in Champions League

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