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Former Thai PM indicted on murder charges

From Kocha Olarn, CNN
updated 4:02 AM EST, Thu December 12, 2013
Demonstrators march towards government buildings in Bangkok on December 9 even after Thailand's PM, Yingluck Shinawatra, called a snap election in attempts to defuse the kingdom's political crisis. Demonstrators march towards government buildings in Bangkok on December 9 even after Thailand's PM, Yingluck Shinawatra, called a snap election in attempts to defuse the kingdom's political crisis.
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Former Thai PM Abhisit Vejjajiva indicted on murder charges
  • Charges relate to a 2010 crackdown on anti-government demonstrators that left 90 dead
  • Bangkok has been shaken by fresh round of anti-government protests
  • Protests are being led by key allies of Abhisit

Bangkok (CNN) -- A Thai court on Thursday indicted former Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva on murder charges over a bloody crackdown on anti-government demonstrators in 2010 that left around 90 people dead.

The indictment, during a closed court session, comes at a time when Bangkok has been shaken by a new round of destabilizing protests. These are led by allies of Abhisit, who is now leader of the opposition Democrat Party.

Bandit Siripan, the lawyer for Abhisit, told CNN that the former premier denied the murder charges against him and was freed after posting bail of 1.8 million baht (US$56,000).

"The pre-trial hearing is expected on March 24 next year," the lawyer said.

READ: Thai PM dissolves parliament

In the latest round of tensions, Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra dissolved the nation's parliament on Monday and called for new elections.

However, the move has done little to appease anti-government protesters who remain on the streets.

READ: Thailand's 'up country' boom fuels political divide

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