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From big screen to your screen: Could celebrities become your e-agents?

By futurist Daniel Burrus, Special to CNN
updated 3:14 AM EST, Thu December 12, 2013
The Samsung Galaxy Gear is the latest gadget which changes the way we use our smartphones. It links up with Samsung's Galaxy smartphones and tablets to let users know when they receive a call, text message or e-mail.
The Samsung Galaxy Gear is the latest gadget which changes the way we use our smartphones. It links up with Samsung's Galaxy smartphones and tablets to let users know when they receive a call, text message or e-mail.
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Mobile innovations that will change your life
Mobile innovations that could change your life
Mobile innovations that will change your life
Mobile innovations that will change your life
Mobile innovations that could change your life
Mobile innovations that could change your life
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The smart phone has revolutionized our personal and professional lives by performing as a multimedia computer
  • It will continue to change your life as intelligent e-agents become personalized
  • Smart phones will evolve in ways that mean they won't need screens -- or big batteries
  • They will also increasingly become your wallet, as cash and credit cards become fixtures of the past

Editor's note: Daniel Burrus is a leading futurist on tech trends and innovation. He is the author of six books, including the New York Times best seller Flash Foresight. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Daniel Burrus.

(CNN) -- The smart phone has revolutionized our personal and professional lives. More than just a phone, they are powerful, networked multimedia computers that we carry with us every day.

Over the next 10 years, they'll get far more advanced, transforming every business process including how we sell, communicate, collaborate, train, and educate.

Here are five ways the mobile phone will change your life over the next decade:

Daniel Burrus
Daniel Burrus

1. Your phone will be your personal assistant. The introduction of Apple's Siri (an intelligent e-agent) gave us a taste of how advanced our phones could be. As Siri-like agents rapidly advance, they will turn into personal assistants, searching the web for you and delivering focused, highly relevant information based on how well it knows you.

The 3D web on your smart phone will be a game-changer for business
Daniel Burrus

Your phone will know your preferences, likes, and needs. It will automatically compile, present, and share what's pertinent to you.

Read more: What is the sharing economy?

Additionally, forget just talking to a faceless voice. Your intelligent e-agent will have a face when you are looking at the screen and a personality that you choose.

You'll even see celebrities and cartoon characters licensing the rights to their digital likeness and personality, to be used as intelligent e-agents for both adults and children.

In this image from 1972, a model demonstrates a "portable radio-telephone" by Pye Telecommunications at a London exhibition called "Communications Today, Tomorrow and the Future." In this image from 1972, a model demonstrates a "portable radio-telephone" by Pye Telecommunications at a London exhibition called "Communications Today, Tomorrow and the Future."
When cellphones were hideous
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When cellphones were hideous When cellphones were hideous

2. Many smartphones won't have a screen. The traditional smart phone with a screen will not go away, but you will have an option for a screen-less smart phone.

This will be a very popular and highly adopted smart phone because without the screen, you get rid of much of the need for a big battery.

Read more: Microsoft's smart bra

Think of the screen-less smart phone like the little piece of jewelry people wore on the old Star Trek TV show. The screen-less smart phone will be touch and voice activated.

When you tap it, you'll be connected to your intelligent e-agent, which is part of a super computer in the cloud. Whatever you need, your intelligent e-agent will be able to verbally give you the information, such as turn-by-turn directions and your email content

3. Augmented reality will make life easier. With augmented reality (AR), you use your smartphone camera to see a live image of a scene in front of you, and an AR app will overlay on the screen pertinent details about the image.

'I'm the original voice of Siri'

For example, you can activate the AR app and using your phone's camera, point the camera to a far off mountain range, and text will overlay onto the image indicating, for example, the name of the mountains, their elevation and typical fauna.

How tech helps beat social barriers

The app does this by using the device's GPS, digital compass, and motion sensors to detect where you're pointing the camera.

Read more: Etsy disrupts global supply chains

But it can go much further.

Imagine walking down a busy shopping district looking for a shoe store that sells a particular brand. With AR, you could tell your phone what you want and then pan your phone's camera down the street.

The name of each store and what brands they sell will appear on your screen, overlaid on the image of the street. Even better, this technology could also be used inside large stores to help you find specific items.

Read more: The Twitter billionaire who believes in small business

4. Your smart phone will have a 3D display and a 3D web browser ... and you won't need special glasses to view it. Instead of just viewing web pages on your smart phone, you'll be able to go into environments (or stores or showrooms) and maneuver around in them, just as you do on devices like the Xbox.

Alternatively, you'll be able to see things sticking out from the screen, again without the special glasses.

The 3D web on your smart phone will be a game-changer for business.

Check e-mails on your watch

5. Your smart phone will increasingly become your wallet. Our wallets are switching from being leather to being phone-based.

Can a headband read your mind?

That means we will use cash and physical credit cards less often, instead making purchases using our smart phones. This makes security even more important.

We will use cash and physical credit cards less often, instead making purchases using our smart phones
Daniel Burrus

Read more: My year of living open source

We already have near-field communications (NFC) chips taking hold in smart phones. These chips can help to speed a transaction when you're buying something. You just get your smart phone close to a cash register that's equipped with a NFC reader and you can do the transaction.

The use of biometrics will also increase as an identifier of who you are. This will include having fingerprint readers like the latest iPhone, audio analysis of your voice, and facial recognition features in phones.

By using all these things together -- your fingerprint, voice, and face -- your phone will provide a secure payment method.

Read more: The trouble with Apple's Touch ID

This is just a small sampling of what we'll see for future smart phone technology. All of these advancements are in their early stages today.

So keep in mind that if it can be done, it will be done. The question is, who will be first?

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Daniel Burrus

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